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Meaning of “enter” in the English Dictionary

"enter" in British English

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enterverb

uk   /ˈen.tər/ us   /ˈen.t̬ɚ/
  • enter verb (PLACE)

A2 [I or T] to come or go into a particular place: The police entered (the building) through/by the side door. You will begin to feel sleepy as the drug enters the bloodstream.

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  • enter verb (COMPETITION)

B1 [I or T] to be included in a competition, race, or exam, or to arrange for someone else to do this: Both men have been entered for/in the 100 metres in Paris next month. All three companies have entered the race to develop a new system. Are you going to enter the photography competition?

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  • enter verb (INFORMATION)

B1 [T] to put information into a computer, book, or document: You have to enter a password to access the database.
[T] formal to make a particular type of statement officially: The prisoner entered a plea of not guilty.

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  • enter verb (ORGANIZATION)

[T] to become a member of a particular organization, or to start working in a particular type of job: Ms Doughty entered politics/Parliament after a career in banking.

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enternoun [S]

uk   /ˈen.tər/ us   /ˈen.t̬ɚ/
the key on a computer keyboard that is used to say that the words or numbers on the screen are correct, or to say that an instruction should be performed, or to move down a line on the screen: Move the cursor to where it says "New File" and press enter.
(Definition of enter from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"enter" in American English

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enterverb

us   /ˈen·tər/
  • enter verb (GO IN)

[I/T] to come or go into a place: [T] The orchestra entered the hall. [T] He entered a shelter for the homeless. [I] Half of the museum’s visitors are children who enter for free.
[I/T] To enter is also to be admitted to or become a member of an organization: [I] He entered the army at the age of 18.
  • enter verb (BEGIN)

[I/T] to begin or become involved in something: [T] The president maintained we were about to enter a period of unprecedented economic growth. [I] She entered into an exclusive contract with an international sports shoe company.
  • enter verb (RECORD)

[T] to make a record of something; list: Did you enter your names in the guest book? Use this computer to enter the data. He was entered (= listed officially as taking part) in the shot put and discus events.
[T] law To enter is to make something, such as a statement or a piece of evidence, a part of the official record: He entered a plea of not guilty.
(Definition of enter from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"enter" in Business English

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enterverb [T]

uk   /ˈentər/ us  
to begin taking part in a particular market or area of business: enter a market/business This ruling should make it easier for first-time buyers to enter the housing market (= to buy a property for the first time).
IT to put information into a computer: At the prompt, please enter a valid email address.enter data/information (into sth) All information is entered into a database and analyzed for patterns.
ACCOUNTING to write information into an account book, a list, etc.: All customer payments must be entered into the accounts book at the time of purchase. Before the meeting, the number of hours requested from each department is entered onto the spreadsheet opposite each project.
if people or goods enter a country or region, they arrive there: Legitimate visa holders should be allowed to enter and leave the country, and to apply for a renewal of their visa while still in America. All cargo vessels entering the port are stopped and inspected.
to begin a period of time: enter an era/a phase/a cycle The company entered a new era today with its first pre-tax profit. Now is not the time to buy, just as we are entering a recession. The country's economy is entering its eighth year of uninterrupted growth.
to start working in a particular type of job, or to become a member of a particular organization: Now is a peak time for young people to enter the profession.
to officially make an agreement or begin a discussion with another person or organization: enter a contract/agreement/partnership The two companies plan to enter a joint distribution agreement to distribute the products in their respective markets. enter discussions/talks with sb
enter the fray
to begin to take part in a competitive situation: The rumoured interest of a US venture capitalist triggered speculation that a rival could enter the fray.
enter a plea of guilty/not guilty
LAW to officially state that you are guilty/not guilty of a crime in a court of law
enter service
to begin to be used for the first time: The A380 - the world's biggest passenger jet - entered service in 2006.
Phrasal verbs

enternoun [U]

uk   /ˈentər/ us   IT
one of the set of moving parts that you press with your fingers on a computer when you have typed an instruction or want to start a new line: Type in the data and then press enter.
(Definition of enter from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“enter” in American English

Watching the detectorists
Watching the detectorists
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by Colin McIntosh You could be forgiven for thinking that old-fashioned hobbies that don’t involve computers have fallen out of favour. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. If anything, the internet has made it easier for people with specialist hobbies from different corners of the world to come together to support one another

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