Meaning of “entitle” in the English Dictionary

"entitle" in British English

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entitleverb [ T ]

uk /ɪnˈtaɪ.təl/ us /ɪnˈtaɪ.t̬əl/

entitle verb [ T ] (ALLOW)

B2 to give someone the right to do or have something:

Being unemployed entitles you to free medical treatment.
[ + to infinitive ] The employer is entitled to ask for references.

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entitle verb [ T ] (GIVE TITLE)

C1 to give a title to a book, film, etc.:

Her latest novel, entitled "The Forgotten Sex", is out this week.

(Definition of “entitle” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"entitle" in American English

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entitleverb [ T ]

us /ɪnˈtɑɪ·t̬əl/

entitle verb [ T ] (ALLOW)

to give someone the right to do or have something:

He’s entitled to his opinion even if you don’t agree with him.
Being over 65 entitles you to a discount at the movies.

entitle verb [ T ] (GIVE TITLE)

to give a title to a book, movie, etc.:

Her latest novel, entitled "The Forgotten Child," is arriving in bookstores this week.

(Definition of “entitle” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"entitle" in Business English

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entitleverb [ T ]

uk /ɪnˈtaɪtl/ us LAW, HR

to give someone the right to do or have something:

entitle sb to (do) sth The chief executive will face protest at the AGM over his contract, which could entitle him to a £5m pay off.
be entitled to (do) sth He was not entitled to receive any compensation.
entitle sb to do sth If I have a registered trademark, does that automatically entitle me to use that mark as my domain name?
be entitled to do sth He was not entitled to receive any compensation under his employment contract.

(Definition of “entitle” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)