estimate Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “estimate” in the English Dictionary

"estimate" in British English

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estimateverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈes.tɪ.meɪt/
B2 to ​guess or ​calculate the ​cost, ​size, ​value, etc. of something: Government ​sources estimate a ​long-term 50 ​percentincrease in ​railfares. [+ (that)] They estimate (that) the ​journey will take at least two ​weeks. [+ question word] It was ​difficult to estimate how many ​trees had been ​destroyed.
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estimated
adjective uk   /-meɪ.tɪd/  us   /-meɪ.t̬ɪd/
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B2 an estimated ​cost/​value

estimatenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈes.tɪ.mət/
B2 a ​guess of what the ​size, ​value, ​amount, ​cost, etc. of something might be: The ​number of ​people who ​applied for the ​course was 120 ​compared with an ​initial estimate of between 50 and 100. We'll ​accept the ​lowest of three estimates for the ​buildingwork. a conservative (= ​low) estimate a rough (= not ​exact) estimate
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(Definition of estimate from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"estimate" in American English

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estimatenoun [C]

 us   /ˈes·tə·mət/
a ​judgment or ​calculation of ​approximately how ​large or how ​great something is: I can only make a ​rough estimate (= an ​amount that is not ​exact) of how many ​people will ​attend. An estimate is also a ​statement of the ​likelycost of ​building something or doing some other ​work.

estimateverb [T]

 us   /ˈes·təˌmeɪt/
to ​guess the ​size, ​cost, etc., of something: We estimated his ​wealth at $500 million. [+ (that) clause] Doctors estimate (that) he has a 70 ​percentchance of ​recovering.
(Definition of estimate from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"estimate" in Business English

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estimateverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈestɪmeɪt/
to say what you believe the ​cost, ​size, ​value, etc. of something is, although you do not know for ​certain: estimate how much/many We should be able to estimate how many ​customers we will have each month. Several ​onlinecalculatorsallow you to estimate your ​carbonemissions.estimate that sth Some ​analysts estimate that about a ​quarter of career-track ​hires in recent ​years have been women.estimate sth to be sth The ​knock-oneconomicbenefit is estimated to be about 1200 ​jobs.estimate sth at sth Global ​oilreserves were estimated at 1,000 ​billionbarrels.

estimatenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈestɪmət/
a guess as to what the ​size, ​value, ​amount, etc. of something might be: make/give/provide an estimate (of sth) Please ​provide an estimate of the ​increasedcost for your ​businessper annum. The estimates are ​based on a ​survey done in the early 1990s, so may no ​longer be ​accurate. The best estimate puts the ​totalnumber of ​sales at about 1,000. apreliminary/​initial/early estimaterough/accurate estimate At a ​rough estimate, three-quarters of the ​farmslisted are ​workingfarms. aconservative/realistic/​reasonable estimate
COMMERCE a ​statement for a possible ​customer about how much a ​piece of ​work should ​cost: give sb/provide/prepare an estimate He will ​compile the ​specifications, ​draw up ​plans, and prepare an estimate.ask for/obtain an estimate (for sth) We can ​offeradvice on how to obtain estimates for ​minorrepairs. If it is discovered that the ​cost will be greater than originally estimated, a revised estimate may then be ​sent to you.
(Definition of estimate from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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