exercise Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “exercise” in the English Dictionary

"exercise" in British English

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exercisenoun

uk   /ˈek.sə.saɪz/  us   /ˈek.sɚ.saɪz/
  • exercise noun (HEALTHY ACTIVITY)

A2 [C or U] physicalactivity that you do to make ​yourbodystrong and ​healthy: Swimming is my ​favourite form of exercise. You really should take more exercise. I dostomach exercises most ​days.

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  • exercise noun (PRACTICE)

C2 [C] an ​action or ​actionsintended to ​improve something or make something ​happen: Ships from eight navies will be taking ​part in an exercise in the ​Pacific to ​improvetheirefficiency in ​combat. It would be a ​useful exercise for you to say the ​speechaloud several ​times. an exercise inpublicrelations
A2 [C] a ​shortpiece of written ​work that you do to ​practise something you are ​learning: The ​book has exercises at the end of every ​chapter.

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exerciseverb

uk   /ˈek.sə.saɪz/  us   /ˈek.sɚ.saɪz/
  • exercise verb (DO HEALTHY ACTIVITY)

B1 [I or T] to do ​physicalactivities to make ​yourbodystrong and ​healthy: She exercises most ​evenings usually by ​running. A work-out in the ​gym will exercise all the ​majormusclegroups.
[T] If you exercise an ​animal, you make it ​walk or ​run so that it ​staysstrong and ​healthy: Now he's ​retired he ​spends most ​afternoons exercising his ​dogs.

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  • exercise verb (USE)

C2 [T] formal to use something: I exercised my ​democratic right by not ​voting in the ​election. Always exercise caution when ​handlingradioactivesubstances. We've ​decided to exercise the option (= use the ​part of a ​legalagreement) to ​buy the ​house we now ​lease.

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(Definition of exercise from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"exercise" in American English

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exercisenoun

 us   /ˈek·sərˌsɑɪz/
  • exercise noun (HEALTHY ACTIVITY)

[C/U] (a) ​physicalactionperformed to make or ​keepyourbodyhealthy: [U] You should get some exercise ​even when you’re ​pregnant. [C] I do five different exercises every ​morning to ​limber up.
  • exercise noun (PRACTICE)

[C] an ​action or ​actionsintended to ​improve something or make something ​happen: The ​military exercises will ​involve several thousand ​soldiers. The ​whole thing was an exercise in ​futility (= ​actions that were ​useless).
[C] An exercise can be written ​work that you do to ​practice something you are ​learning: The ​book has exercises at the end of every ​chapter.
  • exercise noun (USE)

[U] the use of something: The exercise of ​restraint in this ​situation may be ​difficult.

exerciseverb

 us   /ˈek·sərˌsɑɪz/
  • exercise verb (DO HEALTHY ACTIVITY)

[I/T] to do ​physicalactivities to make or ​keepyourbodyhealthy: [I] She goes to the ​gym to exercise every ​evening.
  • exercise verb (USE)

[T] fml to use something: Always exercise ​caution when ​handlingpoisonoussubstances.
(Definition of exercise from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"exercise" in Business English

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exerciseverb

uk   us   /ˈeksəsaɪz/
[I or T] to do ​physicalactivities to make your body ​strong and ​healthy: This ​product is ​aimed at ​people who exercise on a ​regularbasis.
[T] to use something such as a ​right or ​choice: exercise a right/power/choice The ​landlord may exercise his ​right to ​review the ​rent. exercise ​power/​control/​influence (over sth)
exercise an option
FINANCE to ​buy or ​sell the ​shares, etc. that are mentioned in an optionscontract (= an ​agreement giving the ​right to ​buy and ​sellshares in the future): Anyone who exercised such an ​option would immediately ​losemoney.

exercisenoun

uk   us   /ˈeksəsaɪz/
[C or U] physicalactivity that you do to make your body ​strong and ​healthy: do/take exercise The ​office has a gym for those who like to do exercise in their ​lunch hour. There are many ​types of ​equipment out there in the exercise ​market. exercise ​equipment/​machines
[C] an ​action or ​actions intended to ​improve something or make something ​happen: 10,000 scientists and ​businessmen took ​part in an exercise to ​identifytechnologytrends. The outing was ​arranged by the ​firm as ​part of a team-building exercise. a cost-cutting exercise a brainstorming exercise
[U] formal the use of something such as a ​right, ​choice, or ​power: The ​document sets out guidelines on the exercise ofvotingrights.
[U] formal the ​act of doing a particular ​job: Many journalists have ​lost their ​lives in the exercise of their ​profession.
the exercise of an option
FINANCE the ​act of ​buying or ​selling the ​shares, etc. that are mentioned in an optionscontract (= an ​agreement giving the ​right to ​buy and ​sellshares in the future): Shares will be ​transferred within 28 days of the exercise of an ​option.
(Definition of exercise from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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