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Meaning of “faint” in the English Dictionary

"faint" in British English

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faintadjective

uk   /feɪnt/ us   /feɪnt/
  • faint adjective (SLIGHT)

B2 not strong or clear; slight: a faint sound/noise/smell The lamp gave out a faint glow. She gave me a faint smile of recognition. There's not the faintest hope of ever finding him. She bears a faint resemblance to my sister. I have a faint suspicion that you may be right!
not have the faintest idea C2 informal
used to emphasize that you do not know something: "Is she going to stay?" "I haven't the faintest idea." I don't have the faintest idea what you're talking about!

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faintverb [I]

uk   /feɪnt/ us   /feɪnt/
B2 to suddenly become unconscious for a short time, usually falling down: He faints at the sight of blood. I nearly fainted in the heat. She took one look at the hypodermic needle and fainted (dead) away (= became unconscious immediately).

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faintnoun [S]

uk   /feɪnt/ us   /feɪnt/
(Definition of faint from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"faint" in American English

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faintverb [I]

us   /feɪnt/
  • faint verb [I] (LOSE CONSCIOUSNESS)

to become unconscious unexpectedly for a short time: I nearly fainted from the heat.

faintadjective [-er/-est only]

us   /feɪnt/
not strong or clear; slight: He walked along, guided only by the faint light of the moon.
very weak and nearly becoming unconscious: He felt faint from hunger.
(Definition of faint from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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