false Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “false” in the English Dictionary

"false" in British English

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falseadjective

uk   /fɒls/  us   /fɑːls/

false adjective (NOT REAL)

B2 not ​real, but made to ​look or ​seemreal: false eyelashes/​teethUK Modern ​officebuildings have false floors, under which ​computer and ​phonewires can be ​laid.
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false adjective (NOT TRUE)

B1 disapproving not ​true, but made to ​seemtrue in ​order to ​deceivepeople: She was ​charged with giving false evidence in ​court. When she was ​stopped by the ​police for ​speeding, she gave them a false name and ​address. He ​assumed a false identity (= ​pretended he was someone ​else) in ​order to ​escape from the ​police.under false pretences disapproving If you do something under false pretences, you ​lie about who you are, what you are doing, or what you ​intend to do, in ​order to get something: He was ​deported for ​entering the ​country under false pretences. If you're not going to ​offer me a ​job, then you've ​brought me here under false pretences (= you have ​deceived me in ​order to make me come here).
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false adjective (NOT CORRECT)

B1 not ​correct: "Three ​plus three is seven. True or false?" "False." The ​newsreport about the ​explosionturned out to be false. You'll get a false impression/​idea of the ​town if you only ​visit the ​university.
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false adjective (NOT SINCERE)

C1 disapproving not ​sincere or ​expressingrealemotions: a false ​smile/​laugh I didn't like her - she ​seemed false.
Synonym

false adjective (NOT LOYAL)

literary disapproving A false ​friend is not ​loyal or cannot be ​trusted.
(Definition of false from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"false" in American English

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falseadjective [not gradable]

 us   /fɔls/

false adjective [not gradable] (NOT REAL)

(of things) not ​real, but made to ​lookreal, or (of ​information) not ​true but made to ​seemtrue in ​order to ​deceive: Haban used false ​identification to ​enter France. The ​companypresentedclients with ​documentscontaining false ​information.

false adjective [not gradable] (NOT CORRECT)

not ​correct or ​true: "Three ​plus three is seven. True or false?" "False." Note: said about information or an idea

false adjective [not gradable] (NOT SINCERE)

(of ​people or ​theirmanner) ​dishonest or not ​sincere: “I ​think of myself as ​great,” said Tyler, ​abandoning false ​modesty.
falsely
adverb [not gradable]  us   /ˈfɔls·li/
She was falsely ​accused of ​shoplifting.
falsify
verb [T]  us   /ˈfɔl·səˌfɑɪ/
She falsified the ​accountingrecords.
falsity
noun [U]  us   /ˈfɔl·sɪ·t̬i/ (also falseness,  /ˈfɔl·snəs/ )
fml We’re ​trying to ​determine the ​truth or falsity of ​yourpreviousstatement.
(Definition of false from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"false" in Business English

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falseadjective

uk   us   /fɔːls/
not ​true or ​correct: It is an ​offense to give false ​information on your ​applicationform.
made to ​lookreal, especially in ​order to ​deceivepeople: The wanted man is known to be ​travelling under an ​assumedname and with a false ​passport.
based on wrong ​information or a wrong ​idea about someone or something: Many ​immigrantworkers arrive with a false ​impression of western countries.
by or under false pretences if you do or get something by or under false pretences, you do or get it dishonestly by telling lies: The ​official was convicted of obtaining ​property by false pretences. Two ​executives had ​gainedaccess to their rival's ​businessplan under false pretences.
(Definition of false from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“false” in Business English

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