Meaning of “fast track” in the English Dictionary

"fast track" in British English

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fast tracknoun [ S ]

uk /ˈfɑːst ˌtræk/ us /ˈfæst ˌtræk/
fast-track
adjective [ before noun ] uk /ˈfɑːst.træk/ us /ˈfæst-/ UK

fast-track opportunities
They've introduced a fast-track system for brighter pupils which will allow thousands to take their GCSE exams two years early.
fast-track
verb [ T ] uk /ˈfɑːst.træk/ us /ˈfæst-/

His passport application was fast-tracked.

(Definition of “fast track” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"fast track" in American English

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fast tracknoun [ C usually sing ]

/ˈfæst ˌtræk/

the quickest, but usually most competitive, route to success or improvement

(Definition of “fast track” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"fast track" in Business English

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fast tracknoun [ S ]

uk us also fast lane

a way of making progress or achieving something more quickly than usual, especially in your job:

By the summer of 2011, the company was on the fast track to becoming a major player in agricultural genetics.

fast-trackverb [ T ]

uk us

to make it easier for something to happen or for someone to achieve something more quickly than usual:

There are calls for the bill to be fast-tracked through Congress.
fast-tracking
noun [ U ]

(Definition of “fast track” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)