fault Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “fault” in the English Dictionary

"fault" in British English

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faultnoun

uk   /fɒlt/  us   /fɑːlt/

fault noun (MISTAKE)

B1 [U] a ​mistake, ​especially something for which you are to ​blame: It's not my fault she didn't come! She ​believes it was the doctor's fault that Peter ​died. The fault was/​lay with the ​organizers, who ​failed to make the ​necessaryarrangements for ​dealing with so many ​people. Through no fault of his own, he ​spent a ​weeklocked up in ​jail.B2 [C] a ​weakness in a person's ​character: He has many faults, but ​dishonesty isn't one of them.B2 [C] a ​brokenpart or ​weakness in a ​machine or ​system: The ​car has a ​seriousdesign fault. An electrical fault ​caused the ​fire. For all the faults in ​oureducationsystem, it is still ​better than that in many other ​countries. [C] (in ​tennis and some other ​games) a ​mistake made by a ​player who is ​beginning a ​game by ​hitting the ​ballbe at fault B2 to have done something ​wrong: Her ​doctor was at fault for/in not ​sending her ​straight to a ​specialist.find fault with sb/sth C2 to ​criticize someone or something, ​especially without good ​reasons: He's always ​finding fault with my ​work.
More examples

fault noun (CRACK)

[C] specialized geology a crack in the earth's ​surface where the ​rock has ​divided into two ​parts that ​move against each other: Surveyors say the fault line is ​capable of ​generating a ​majorearthquakeonce in a hundred ​years.

faultverb

uk   /fɒlt/  us   /fɑːlt/

fault verb (CRITICIZE)

[T] to ​find a ​reason to ​criticize someone or something: I can't fault the way they ​dealt with the ​complaint. I can't fault you onyourlogic.

fault verb (SPORTS)

[I] to ​hit a fault in ​tennis and other ​similargames: That's the fourth ​serve he's faulted on today.
(Definition of fault from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"fault" in American English

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faultnoun

 us   /fɔlt/

fault noun (SOMETHING WRONG)

[C] a ​quality in a ​person that ​shows that the ​person is not ​perfect, or a ​condition of something that ​shows that it is not ​workingperfectly: He ​loves me in ​spite of my faults. Some ​peoplefind fault in everything they ​see.

fault noun (RESPONSIBILITY)

[U] responsibility for a ​mistake or for having done something ​wrong: I ​screwed up, so it was my fault we didn’t ​finish on ​time. The ​driver was at fault (= ​responsible) for the ​accident – he was going too ​fast.

fault noun (CRACK)

earth science [C] a ​crack in the earth’s ​surface where the ​rock is ​divided into two ​parts that can move against each other in an earthquake (= a ​sudden, ​violentmovement of the earth’s ​surface)
Idioms

faultverb [T]

 us   /fɔlt/

fault verb [T] (RESPONSIBILITY)

to ​blame someone: Professional ​athletes cannot be faulted for making millions of ​dollars when they ​attract the ​fans that make the ​sportpopular.
(Definition of fault from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"fault" in Business English

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faultnoun

uk   us   /fɔːlt/
[C] something that is wrong with a ​machine or ​system: The ​car had a serious design fault and had to be ​recalled. An electrical fault caused the ​fire.
[U] the fact of being ​responsible for something ​bad that ​happens: be sb's fault (that) It was the ​traders' fault that so many ​billions were ​lost.be the fault of sb The ​courtfound that the accident was the fault of the ​localauthority. the fault lies with sb We need to decide whether the fault lies with the ​buyer or the ​seller in this ​case.
no-fault LAW relating to ​legalprocesses, ​insuranceclaims, etc. in which it is not necessary to decide who is ​responsible for a ​badsituation: He ​introduced the nation's first no-fault ​autoinsurancelaw. a no-fault ​contract/divorce/​system
(Definition of fault from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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