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Meaning of “feeling” in the English Dictionary

"feeling" in British English

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feelingnoun

uk   /ˈfiː.lɪŋ/ us   /ˈfiː.lɪŋ/
  • feeling noun (SENSE)

B1 [C or U] the fact of feeling something physical: I had a tingling feeling in my fingers. I've got this strange feeling in my stomach. My toes were so cold that I'd lost all feeling in them.

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  • feeling noun (EMOTION)

B1 [C or U] emotion: The feeling of loneliness suddenly overwhelmed him. There's a feeling of dissatisfaction with the government. [+ that] I got the feeling that I was not welcome. Her performance seemed to me completely lacking in feeling.
feelings [plural]

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B1 emotions, especially those influenced by other people: Some people say that dogs have feelings. I wanted to spare his feelings (= not to upset him), so I didn't tell him what she'd said about him.
  • feeling noun (OPINION)

B2 [C] opinion: My feeling is that we had better act quickly or it will be too late.

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(Definition of feeling from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"feeling" in American English

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feelingnoun

us   /ˈfi·lɪŋ/
  • feeling noun (EXPERIENCE)

[C/U] a physical or emotional experience or awareness: [U] My toes were so cold that I lost all feeling in them. [C] I have a feeling that I’m not welcome.
[C/U] Your feelings are your awareness of the way you should be treated, esp. when you are treated rudely: [pl] He doesn’t mean to hurt your feelings.
  • feeling noun (OPINION)

[C] an opinion or belief: My feeling is that we should wait until they come back. He has strong feelings about environmental issues.
(Definition of feeling from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"feeling" in Business English

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feelingnoun

uk   /ˈfiːlɪŋ/ us  
[C or U] something that you feel with your body or mind: I had a funny feeling in my stomach before my interview. The redundancies created bad feeling between the new manager and the remaining staff.
[C, usually singular] an opinion or thought about something: I have a feeling that they will accept our offer. I get the feeling that staff aren't happy with the pay offer. My gut feeling is that we are launching this product too late.
[S] also feel the character of a place or situation: The simple, clean design of the furniture conveys a sophisticated feeling.
(Definition of feeling from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“feeling” in British English

“feeling” in American English

“feeling” in Business English

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