fight Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “fight” in the English Dictionary

"fight" in British English

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uk   us   /faɪt/ (fought, fought)
B1 [I or T] to use ​physicalforce to ​try to ​defeat another ​person or ​group of ​people: There were ​children fighting in the ​playground. The ​soldiers fought from ​house to ​house. They fought with (= on the ​side of) the ​North against the ​South. The ​birds were fighting over (= ​competing for) a ​scrap of ​food. They fight like ​cats and ​dogs (= fight or ​argue very ​angrily and ​violently). They fought to the ​bitter end/to the ​death (= until everyone on one ​side was ​dead or ​completelydefeated).B2 [I or T] to use a lot of ​effort to ​defeat or ​achieve something, or to ​stop something ​happening: He fought the ​diseasebravely for three ​years. We need the public's ​help in fighting crime. He fought againstracism. Vitamin C is ​thought to ​help fight ​colds and ​flu. They had to fight hard forimprovements to the ​roadsystem. One of the ​passengers was fighting for her ​life (= so ​ill or ​injured that she might ​die) last ​night after ​receivingmultipleinjuries in the ​collision. With ​debts of over $2 million, the ​corporation is fighting for ​itslife (= ​people are ​trying hard to ​stop it being ​destroyed) I had to fight (back) (= ​tried hard not to show or ​produce) the ​tears when he said he was ​leaving. The ​bank fought off (= ​successfullyprevented) a ​takeover by another ​bankrecently. I was getting a ​cold at the ​start of the ​week but I ​seem to have fought it off (= got ​rid of it).B2 [I] informal to ​argue: I ​wish they wouldn't fight in ​front of the ​kids. I could ​hear them fighting aboutmoney again.
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Phrasal verbs


uk   us   /faɪt/
B1 [C] an ​argument or an ​occasion when someone uses ​physicalforce to ​try to ​defeat someone: Jeff's always getting into/​starting fights. The ​olderboys broke up (= ​stopped) the fight.UK I had a stand-up fight with her (= we ​arguedstrongly) about the ​phonebill. Do you have ​tickets for thebig fight (= ​boxingcompetition)? He put up a fight when the ​policetried to ​arrest him.B2 [C] a ​situation in which you use a lot of ​effort to ​defeat someone or ​achieve something, or to ​stop something ​happening: We must ​continue the fight againsthomelessness. He ​died last ​week after a ​long fight withcancer. They put up a good fight (= ​played well) against a more ​experiencedteam. [U] the ​wish or ​ability to fight or ​actenergetically: The ​team came out on the ​fieldfull of fight.
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(Definition of fight from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"fight" in American English

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fightverb [I/T]

 us   /fɑɪt/ (past tense and past participle fought  /fɔt/ )
to ​argue with or use ​force against another ​person or a ​group of ​people, or to ​oppose something: [T] Rebels have been fighting ​fiercebattles with ​governmentforces. [I] They’re fighting against some ​powerfulorganizations. [I] She’s ​willing to fight for a more just ​society. [I] Those two little ​kids were fighting over a ​toy. [T] Gordon has been fighting an ​uphillbattle to ​attractinvestors. Two ​people who fight may be ​boxing: [T] Lewis will fight Akinwande for the ​heavyweighttitle.
noun [U]  us   /ˈfɑɪt̬·ɪŋ/
The fighting ​lasted a ​longtime.

fightnoun [C]

 us   /fɑɪt/
an ​argument, or an ​occasion when someone uses ​force to ​defeat someone or ​oppose something: Isabelle is ​looking for a fight. A patient’s ​attitude is ​important in the fight against the ​disease. Have you got ​tickets for the fight (= a ​competition between two ​boxers)?
(Definition of fight from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“fight” in British English

“fight” in American English

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