figure Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “figure” in the English Dictionary

"figure" in British English

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figurenoun [C]

uk   /ˈfɪɡ.ər/  us   /-jʊr/
  • figure noun [C] (NUMBER)

B1 the ​symbol for a ​number or an ​amountexpressed in ​numbers: Can you ​read this figure? Is it a three or an eight? Write the ​amount in both words and figures. I ​lookedquickly down the column of figures. He ​earns a six-figure ​salary (= an ​amount of ​money with six figures).in single/double figures C2 between 1 and 9/between 10 and 99: The ​unemploymentrate is now in ​double figures.

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  • figure noun [C] (SHAPE)

B2 the ​shape of the ​humanbody, or a ​person: I could ​see two ​tall figures in the ​distance. A ​strangebearded figure (= ​person)entered the ​room.figurative She was a central/​key/​leading figure in (= was an ​importantperson in) the ​movement for ​constitutionalreform. a ​painting, ​drawing, or ​model of a ​person: There are several ​reclining figures in the ​painting.B1 a woman's ​bodyshape: She's got a ​beautiful figure. She got her figure back (= ​returned to her ​usualshape) after having the ​baby.

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figureverb

uk   /ˈfɪɡ.ər/  us   /-jʊr/
  • figure verb (EXPECT)

B1 [I] mainly US to ​expect or ​think that something will ​happen: [+ (that)] We figured (that) you'd ​want to ​rest after ​yourtrip.

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  • figure verb (NUMBER)

[T] US to ​calculate an ​amount: I'm still figuring my ​taxes.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of figure from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"figure" in American English

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figurenoun [C]

 us   /ˈfɪɡ·jər/
  • figure noun [C] (NUMBER)

a ​number or an ​amount: The ​collection was valued at $20 million, a figure that might ​cover the ​cost of having ​artists recreate the ​drawings.
  • figure noun [C] (SHAPE)

a ​shape or ​form: geometric/​abstract figures
  • figure noun [C] (BODY)

the ​shape of a person’s ​body, or a ​bodyseen not ​clearly or from a ​distance: I could ​see two figures ​crossing the ​field in the ​distance.
  • figure noun [C] (PERSON)

A ​particulartype of figure is a ​person with that ​characteristic: Our ​consultants are ​prominent figures in ​theirfield.
  • figure noun [C] (PICTURE)

(abbreviation fig.) a ​picture or ​drawing, often ​numbered, in a ​book or ​document: Figure 10.3 ​shows the ​maximumlength of the ​bridges.

figureverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈfɪɡ·jər/
  • figure verb [I/T] (EXPECT)

to ​expect, ​believe, ​decide, or ​think that something will ​happen or that ​certainconditions will ​exist: [+ (that) clause] They figured (that) about twenty ​people would be there. [I] You can’t figure on going out and being back in two ​hours. fig. If something figures, you are ​unhappy about it but you ​expected it: [I] "He’ll be late for ​dinner." "That figures!"
(Definition of figure from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"figure" in Business English

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figurenoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈfɪɡər/
an ​amount shown as a ​number, used especially in ​documents and ​reports: Overall Christmas sales figuresreleased earlier this week were disappointing.official/government figures US ​exports to Saudi Arabia were ​valued at 6.2 ​billiondollars, according to ​official figures.latest/final/interim figure The latest figures show that ​averagespending on ​food is now around 15% of ​income.closing/opening/preliminary figure Many ​professionals prefer this ​chart as it ​shows the ​fullrange of the ​pricemovements rather than just the ​closing figure.a high/low figure A high figure may ​indicate that the ​economy is ​overheating, as ​consumersborrow in ​order to ​live beyond their ​means.average/rough/approximate figure He was able to give me an ​approximate figure of £36,000. In five ​years they ​plan to have 2,010 ​stores - almost ​double the ​current figure.the actual/exact figure I can't remember the ​exact figure, but it was $10 ​billion or thereabouts.unemployment/crime figures There was ​positivenews in the ​labourmarket, with unexpectedly good ​unemployment figures.listening/viewing/attendance figures Listening figures for the breakfast show have ​risen, helping the ​stationpush its ​audienceshare back over 10 ​percent.
a ​number shown as a ​symbol rather than a word: The figure 6 was clearly ​marked on the door. Write 'twelve thousand and fifty six' in figures.
an important or well-known ​person: public/industry/political figure Public figures from athletes to religious ​leaders have ​campaigned on the ​issue.central/key/major figure She is a ​central figure in the sport and the ​president of its ​dominantorganization.senior/leading/prominent figure The controversial ​paper was attacked by many prominent figures within the scientific ​establishment.government/corporate figure Normally a ​routineoverseastrip by a ​government figure would hardly ​warrantattention.
put a figure on sth to give an ​exactamount or ​number: It is difficult to put a figure on the ​cost of the ​repairwork, as it is still ​rising.
single/double figures the ​numbers 1 to 9/10 to 99: Many of these ​companies have ​low price-earnings ​ratios, some in ​single figures. There are fears that ​inflation could soon run into ​double figures.
six-figure/seven-figure used to describe a ​number in the hundreds of thousands or millions: She has a ​top City ​job with a six-figure ​salary.

figureverb

uk   us   /ˈfɪɡər/
[T] to ​calculate something: figure that Economists figure that the ​average snowmobiler ​spends about $555 ​per visit to the Yellowstone ​area.
[I] to appear or to be ​included in something: figure in sth The ​cost of ​highereducation is expected to figure prominently in all of the ​parties' ​policies this November.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of figure from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“figure” in Business English

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