finance Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “finance” in the English Dictionary

"finance" in British English

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financenoun

uk   us   /ˈfaɪ.næns/
B2 [U] (the ​management of) a ​supply of ​money: corporate/​personal/​public finance the ​minister of finance/the finance ​minister You need to ​speak to someone in the finance department. The finance committeecontrols the school's ​budget.finances [plural]
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B2 the ​money that a ​person or ​company has: We ​keep a ​tightcontrol on the organization's finances.UK informal My finances won't run to (= I do not have enough ​money to ​buy) a new ​car this ​year.
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financeverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈfaɪ.næns/
B2 to ​provide the ​moneyneeded for something to ​happen: The ​citycouncil has ​refused to finance the ​project.
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(Definition of finance from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"finance" in American English

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financenoun

 us   /fəˈnæns, ˈfɑɪ·næns/
the ​management of ​money, or the ​moneybelonging to a ​person, ​group, or ​organization: [U] corporate/​personal finance [pl] the city’s finances
financial
adjective [not gradable]  us   /fəˈnæn·ʃəl, fɑɪ-/
financial ​problems
financially
adverb [not gradable]  us   /fəˈnæn·ʃə·li, fɑɪ-/
We’re in ​fairly good ​shape financially.
(Definition of finance from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"finance" in Business English

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financenoun

uk   us   /ˈfaɪnæns/
[U] UK (also financing) moneyborrowed from an ​investor, ​bank, ​organization, etc. in ​order to ​pay for something: raise/get/obtain finance Other ways of ​raising finance ​includeequityrelease on a ​home and ​flexiblemortgages.arrange/provide/offer finance for sth The state-owned ​bankprovides finance for ​buying homes.require/need/seek finance All of these ​strategiesrequired finance.
[U] the ​activity or ​business of ​managingmoney, especially for a ​company or ​government: finance industry/sector Employment is expected to ​grow in finance, ​insurance, ​realestate, ​trade and ​servicesindustries.finance minister/director/committee The finance ​directorreported a 3% ​rise in ​sales.
[U] ECONOMICS the ​study of the way ​money is used and ​managed in the ​economy: There, he ​studiedcorporate finance and learned how to read ​incomestatements and ​balance sheets.
finances [plural] money that is ​available for a ​person, ​company, ​government, etc. to use, and the way that it is used: manage/control/handle your finances Many ​customers use ​onlinebankingservices to ​manage their finances.personal/public/government finances Recession and ill-judged ​taxcuts have put ​extra strain on the ​public finances.
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financeverb

uk   us   /ˈfaɪnæns/
[T] to ​provide or ​lend the ​money needed to ​pay for something : finance a project/development/programme 20% of the ​budget has been set aside to ​help finance the ​project.be financed by/with/through Corporate acquisitions will likely be financed through the issuance of high-yield ​bonds.
(Definition of finance from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“finance” in Business English

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