find Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “find” in the English Dictionary

"find" in British English

See all translations

findverb

uk   /faɪnd/  us   /faɪnd/ (found, found)
  • find verb (DISCOVER)

A1 [T] to discover, especially where a thing or person is, either unexpectedly or by searching, or to discover where to get or how to achieve something: I've just found a ten-pound note in my pocket. I couldn't find Andrew's phone number. You'll find the knives and forks in the left-hand drawer. Researchers are hoping to find a cure for the disease. [+ two objects] Has he found himself a place to live yet? [+ obj + adj ] She was found unconscious and bleeding. [+ that] The study found that men who were married lived longer than those who were not. Do you think they'll ever find a way of bringing peace to the region? We're really struggling to find (= get) enough money to pay the rent. After years of abuse from her husband, she eventually found the courage to leave him. I wish I could find (the) time to do more reading.
B1 [T] to realize that something exists or has happened: [+ (that)] We came home to find (that) the cat had had kittens. I found (that) I could easily swim a mile.
be found
B2 to exist or be present somewhere: Many plant and animal species are found only in the rainforests. Vitamin C is found in citrus fruit.
find your way
to get somewhere you are trying to reach: I had a map but I still couldn't find my way back to the hotel.
find fault with
to criticize someone or something: She's always finding fault with the way he works.
find yourself
B2 to realize that you are in a particular situation or place, or doing a particular thing, when you did not intend to: He'll find himself with no friends at all if he carries on behaving this way. We fell asleep on the train and woke up to find ourselves in Calais.
often humorous If you go somewhere or do something to find yourself, you go there or do it to discover your true character: Simon spent a year in an ashram in India to find himself.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • find verb (JUDGE)

B2 [I or T] to make a judgment in a law court: [+ obj + adj ] In a unanimous verdict, the jury found him guilty/not guilty of the murder.

findnoun [C]

uk   /faɪnd/  us   /faɪnd/
(Definition of find from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"find" in American English

See all translations

findverb

 us   /fɑɪnd/ (past tense and past participle found  /fɑʊnd/ )
  • find verb (DISCOVER)

[T] to see where a thing or person is, either unexpectedly or by searching; discover: I found a ten-dollar bill in my pocket. I hope I can find a place to live near work. Many plant and animal species are found (= exist) only in the rain forests.
[T] Someone who finds information begins to understand something: [+ that clause] The study found that men who took an aspirin a day have fewer heart attacks. Some insects have been found to live several years without water.
[T] If you find a quality within yourself, you suddenly develop it or learn that you have it: She found the courage to leave the town where she was born.
[T] To find someone means to meet someone you can have a close, loving relationship with: Ellen found Sascha, married him, and soon after they had twins.
  • find verb (JUDGE)

[I/T] law to make a judgment in a law court: [T] to be found guilty/innocent
Phrasal verbs

findnoun [C]

 us   /fɑɪnd/
  • find noun [C] (THING DISCOVERED)

a good or valuable thing or a special person that has been discovered: She’s a real find – singers like her don’t grow on trees.
(Definition of find from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"find" in Business English

See all translations

findverb [T]

uk   us   /faɪnd/ (found, found)
to be successful in getting something: find work/employment/a job, etc. I have only managed to find part-time work which doesn't pay anything like what I was earning before. It's very difficult to find good sales people.find an answer As yet we haven't found an answer to the question of what to do when he retires. The company needs to find £5 million by the end of the month to avoid going into administration. Somehow they managed to find £10,000 for a deposit on the apartment.
to discover where something is: It isn't easy to find their contact details on their website. I can't find the file I created yesterday.
(also find (sth) out) to discover information or a fact: find that The study found that 60% of small and mid-sized firms in and around Paris reported a drop in sales since the strikes began. We found out that our competitors were selling a similar product at a much higher price.
See also
LAW to decide on a particular judgment in a court of law: find sb guilty/innocent All three men were found guilty of conspiracy to defraud.
find (the) time (for sth/to do sth)
if you find the time for something, you have enough time for it: You need to find the time to check the figures before you send out the report.
find against sb
LAW to decide in a court of law that someone is wrong: The Advertising Standards Authority has found against the multinational in a case that could prove to be significant.
find for sb (also find in sb's favour, US find in sb's favor)
LAW to decide in a court of law that someone is right: The employment tribunal found in my favour, and I received compensation for losing my job.
(Definition of find from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of find?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“find” in Business English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

Read More 

Word of the Day

shade

to prevent direct light from shining on something

Word of the Day

convo noun
convo noun
May 23, 2016
informal a conversation The convo around concussions mostly focuses on guys who play football, but Chastain thinks that this whole thing could be a headache for women too.

Read More