fire Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “fire” in the English Dictionary

"fire" in British English

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firenoun

uk   /faɪər/  us   /faɪr/

fire noun (FLAMES)

A2 [C or U] (​material that is in) the ​state of ​burning that ​producesflames that ​send out ​heat and ​light, and might ​producesmoke: Animals are usually ​afraid of fire. The fire was started by ​childrenplaying with ​matches. 40 ​peoplehelped to put out (= ​stop) the fire. The ​library was ​badlydamaged in the fire. How many ​historicbuildings are ​damaged by fire each ​year? She had to be ​rescued when her ​house caught (US caught on) fire (= ​started to ​burn).B1 [C] a ​smallcontrolled fire that is used for ​heating or ​cooking: It's very ​cold in here - should I light a fire? We built a fire on the ​beach. We put up ​ourtents and made a ​small fire.on fire B1 If something is on fire, it is ​burning when it should not be: If ​yourhome was on fire and you could ​save only one thing, what would it be? [C] UK a ​gas or electricheater that is used to ​warm up a ​room: a ​gas/​electric fire If you're ​cold just put the fire on.
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fire noun (SHOOT)

C2 [U] the ​shooting of ​guns or other ​weapons: The ​police opened fire on (= ​startedshooting at) the ​protesters. The ​command was given to cease fire (= ​stopshooting). The ​city came under fire from anti-government ​forces last ​night.

fire noun (EMOTION)

[U] strongemotion: The fire in her ​speechinspired everyone.
See also

fireverb

uk   /faɪər/  us   /faɪr/

fire verb (SHOOT)

B2 [I or T] to ​cause a ​weapon to ​shootbullets, ​arrows, or missiles: He fired his ​gun into the ​air. Someone ​started firing at us. Without ​warning he ​started firing into the ​crowd. I just ​prayed that he would ​stop firing. The ​ambassadordenied that any ​missiles had been fired ​across the ​border. [T or I] to ​direct a ​series of ​questions or ​criticisms at someone: The ​journalists were firing ​questions at me for two ​wholehours. "I'd like to ​ask you some ​questions about ​yourchildhood." "Fire away!" (= You can ​startasking them now.)
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fire verb (REMOVE FROM A JOB)

B2 [T] to ​remove someone from ​theirjob, either because they have done something ​wrong or ​badly, or as a way of ​saving the ​cost of ​employing them: She was fired after she was ​caughtstealing from her ​employer. He was fired from his $165,000 ​job forpoorperformance. She has just been fired as ​editor of the ​newspaper. The ​company is ​reducingitsworkforce by firing 500 ​employees.
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fire verb (EXCITE)

C2 [T] to ​cause a ​strongemotion in someone: I had a ​brilliantEnglishteacher who fired me withenthusiasm for ​literature at an early ​age. Talk of ​treasure and ​lostcities had fired ​their imaginations.

fire verb (HEAT)

[T] to ​heatobjects made of ​clay in a kiln (= a ​specialoven) so that they ​become hard
(Definition of fire from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"fire" in American English

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firenoun

 us   /fɑɪər/

fire noun (FLAMES)

[C/U] the ​state of ​burning, or a ​burningmass of ​material: [U] The ​factory had to be ​closed because the ​risk of fire was too ​great. [C] There have been a lot of ​forest fires because of the ​drought. [C] The ​library was ​badlydamaged in the fire. [U] The ​theater was ​destroyed by fire. [C] Over a hundred ​volunteers were ​needed to put out the fire (= ​stop it). [C/U] A fire is also a ​smallcontrolledmass of ​burningmaterial that is used for ​heating or ​cooking: [C] Light a fire in the ​fireplace.on fire If something is on fire, it is ​burning, esp. when it is not ​meant to be: By the ​time the ​firefightersarrived, the ​wholehouse was on fire.

fire noun (SHOOTING)

[U] the ​act of ​shootingbullets or other explosives from a ​weapon: The ​troops were ​ordered to ​cease fire (= ​stopshooting). The ​soldiersopened fire (= ​startedshooting).

fire noun (EMOTION)

[U] strongemotion: The fire in her ​speechinspired everyone to ​carry on in ​spite of ​recentsetbacks.

fireverb

 us   /fɑɪər/

fire verb (SHOOT)

[I/T] to ​shootbullets or other explosives from a ​weapon: [T] He fired his ​gun into the ​air. [I] The ​soldiersbegan firing. [T] fig. The journalists ​kept firing ​questions at the ​president (= ​asking him ​questionsquickly one after the other). [I] fig. "I’d like to ​ask you some ​personalquestions." "Fire away (= You can ​startimmediately)!"

fire verb (LOSE JOB)

[T] to ​order someone to give up his or her ​job: She was fired for ​stealing from her ​employer.

fire verb (EXCITE)

[T] to ​cause a ​strongemotion in someone: She’s all fired up (= ​excited) about going to ​college.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of fire from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"fire" in Business English

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fireverb [T]

uk   us   /faɪər/ (UK also sack)
HR to make someone ​leave their ​job, especially because they have done something wrong: fire sb for sth He was told that he was being fired for revealing ​confidentialinformation.be fired from sth She was fired from her ​job because of ​poorattendance. The problem for City Council is that we do not have the ​authority to hire and fireemployees.
(Definition of fire from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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