folk Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “folk” in the English Dictionary

"folk" in British English

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folknoun

uk   /fəʊk/  us   /foʊk/
  • folk noun (PEOPLE)

B2 [plural] mainly UK (US usually folks) people, ​especially those of a ​particulargroup or ​type: old folk Ordinary folk can't ​affordcars like that.folks [plural] [as form of address] informal used when ​speakinginformally to a ​group of ​people: All ​right, folks, dinner's ​ready! B2 someone's ​parents: I'm going ​home to ​see my folks.

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  • folk noun (MUSIC)

B1 [U] modernmusic and ​songs that are written in a ​stylesimilar to that of ​traditionalmusic: I ​enjoylistening to folk (​music). folk singers a folk club/​festival

folkadjective [before noun]

uk   /fəʊk/  us   /foʊk/
(Definition of folk from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"folk" in American English

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folkadjective [not gradable]

 us   /foʊk/
traditional to or ​typical of the ​people of a ​particulargroup or ​country: folk ​art/​dance
(Definition of folk from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “folk”
in Korean 사람들…
in Arabic ناس…
in Malaysian orang…
in French gens…
in Russian люди, народная музыка…
in Chinese (Traditional) 人們, (尤指某一群體或類型的)人們…
in Italian gente…
in Turkish insanlar, halk, halk türküsü…
in Polish ludzie, folk…
in Spanish gente…
in Vietnamese người…
in Portuguese pessoas, povo, gente…
in Thai ประชาชน…
in German die Leute (pl.)…
in Catalan gent…
in Japanese 人々…
in Chinese (Simplified) 人们, (尤指某一群体或类型的)人们…
in Indonesian rakyat…
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“folk” in British English

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