fond Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “fond” in the English Dictionary

"fond" in British English

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fondadjective

uk   /fɒnd/  us   /fɑːnd/

fond adjective (LIKING)

be fond of sb/sth B1 to like someone or something very much; to like doing something: She was very fond of ​horses. "I'm very fond of you, you ​know," he said. My ​brother is fond of ​pointing out my ​mistakes. [before noun] happy and ​loving: Many of us have fond memories of ​ourchildhoods. We said a fond farewell to each other (= we said ​goodbye in a ​loving way) and ​promised to write.
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fond adjective (FOOLISH)

a fond belief/hope something that you would like to be ​true but that is ​probably not: I ​waited at ​home all ​evening in the fond ​hope that he might ​call.
(Definition of fond from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"fond" in American English

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fondadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /fɑnd/
having ​feelings of ​affection for someone or something, or having a ​liking for an ​activity: I’m really fond of my ​aunt and ​enjoyseeing her. She had fond ​memories of her ​childhood. Charles is fond of ​driving, so I’m ​happy just to be a ​passenger.
fondly
adverb  us   /ˈfɑnd·li/
He smiled fondly at his ​wife.
(Definition of fond from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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