foot Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “foot” in the English Dictionary

"foot" in British English

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footnoun

uk   /fʊt/  us   /fʊt/
  • foot noun (BODY PART)

A1 [C] (plural feet) the part of the body at the bottom of the leg on which a person or animal stands: I've got a blister on my left foot. I've been on my feet (= standing) all day and I'm exhausted.informal You look tired. Why don't you put your feet up (= sit or lie down with your feet resting on something)? Please wipe your feet (= clean the bottom of your shoes) before you come into the house.
get/rise to your feet
C2 to stand up after you have been sitting: He rose to his feet when she walked in.
on foot
A2 walking: Are you going by bicycle or on foot?

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  • foot noun (MEASUREMENT)

B1 [C] (plural feet or foot) (written abbreviation ft) a unit of measurement, equal to twelve inches or 0.3048 metres, sometimes shown by the symbol ′: The man was standing only a few feet away. She is five feet/foot three inches tall. She is 5′ 3″ tall.

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  • foot noun (BOTTOM)

C1 [S] the bottom or lower end of a space or object: They built a house at the foot of a cliff. She dreamed she saw someone standing at the foot of her bed. There's a note explaining the quotation at the foot of the page.

footverb [T]

uk   /fʊt/  us   /fʊt/ informal
(Definition of foot from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"foot" in American English

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footnoun

 us   /fʊt/
  • foot noun (BODY PART)

[C] (plural feet  /fit/ ) the part of the body at the bottom of the leg on which a person or animal stands: I’ve got a blister on my left foot. He got to/jumped to/rose to his feet (= stood up) to get a better look at the parade passing by. I’ve been on my feet (= standing) all day serving customers. The driver of the stolen car fled the scene on foot (= walking).
  • foot noun (MEASUREMENT)

[C] (plural foot or feet  /fit/ ) (abbreviation ft., symbol ') a unit of measurement of length equal to 12 inches or 0.3048 meters
  • foot noun (BOTTOM)

[U] the bottom or end of a space or object: She dreamed she saw someone standing at the foot of her bed.
(Definition of foot from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"foot" in Business English

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footnoun

uk   us   /fʊt/
[C] (plural feet, foot) (written abbreviation ft) MEASURES a unit of measurement equal to 12 inches or 0.3048 metres, sometimes shown by the symbol ′: His brief was to provide 10 million square feet of office space on a 16-acre site.
[S] the bottom or lower end of something: the foot of sth Additional notes are added at the foot of the page.
be run/rushed off your feet
to be extremely busy: Business was booming, and everyone in the office was rushed off their feet.
drag your feet
to be very slow in doing sth, for example taking a decision: Reformers claim that the FSA is dragging its feet on banking reform.
fall/land on your feet
to be successful or lucky, especially after a period of not having success or luck: After the redundancies, about a fifth of the workers immediately landed on their feet, getting jobs at a local start-up company.
get back on your feet (also get sb/sth back on their feet)
to start experiencing an improved situation after a time of trouble or difficulty or to help a person, company, etc. to do this: There is enormous support for quick, low-interest loans to help companies get back on their feet after a disaster.
get a/your foot in the door
to enter a business or an organization at a low level, but with a chance of being more successful in the future: Graduate Careers Opportunities will help you get a foot in the door of your chosen career.
get your feet wet
to start doing something new: The company got its feet wet by taking a stand at the trader's exhibition.

footverb

uk   us   /fʊt/
foot the bill
to pay the cost of something: Senior managers might be able to get employers to foot the bill for a weekend executive-MBA program.
(Definition of foot from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“foot” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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