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Meaning of “foreign” in the English Dictionary

"foreign" in British English

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foreignadjective

uk   /ˈfɒr.ən/  us   /ˈfɔːr.ən/
A2 belonging or connected to a country that is not your own: Spain was the first foreign country she had visited. foreign languages His work provided him with the opportunity for a lot of foreign travel.
foreign to formal
C2 Something can be described as foreign to a particular person if they do not know about it or it is not within their experience: The whole concept of democracy, she claimed, was utterly foreign to the present government.
A foreign object or substance has entered something else, possibly by accident, and does not belong there: a foreign object/substance foreign matter

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(Definition of foreign from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"foreign" in American English

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foreignadjective [not gradable]

 us   /ˈfɔr·ən, ˈfɑr-/
belonging or connected to a country that is not your own or is not the one you are in: a foreign country a foreign language
(Definition of foreign from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"foreign" in Business English

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foreignadjective

uk   us   /ˈfɒrɪn/
in or from a country that is not your own: a foreign brand/company/firm The company represents some foreign brands as their agents or distributors.foreign capital/debt/investment The country needs to attract foreign investment into manufacturing. foreign competition/markets/trade
(Definition of foreign from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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