freeze Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “freeze” in the English Dictionary

"freeze" in British English

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freezeverb

uk   /friːz/  us   /friːz/ (froze, frozen)
  • freeze verb (COLD)

B1 [I or T] If you freeze something, you lower its temperature below 0°C, causing it to become cold and often hard, and if something freezes, its temperature goes below 0°C: Water freezes to ice at a temperature of 0°C. The ground had frozen hard/solid. When the lake freezes (over) (= turns into ice on the surface), we can go skating on it. Our pipes froze (up) (= the water in them turned to ice) several times last winter. The weather forecast says that it is going to freeze tonight (= that the temperature will be at or below 0°C). Without a sleeping bag, you would freeze to death (= become so cold that you die) out there on the mountainside.
B1 [I or T] to make food last a long time by storing it at a very low temperature so that it becomes hard: I'll freeze any food that's left over. Most soups freeze (= can be preserved by being stored at a very low temperature) well.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

  • freeze verb (MONEY/PROPERTY)

[T] To freeze something such as pay or prices is to fix it at a particular level and not allow any increases: The government has frozen pensions until the end of next year.
[T] to officially and legally prevent money or property from being used or moved: When it was obvious the company was going bankrupt, the government ordered all their assets to be frozen.
Phrasal verbs

freezenoun

uk   /friːz/  us   /friːz/
(Definition of freeze from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"freeze" in American English

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freezeverb [I/T]

 us   /friz/ (past tense froze  /froʊz/ , past participle frozen  /ˈfroʊ·zən/ )
to become cold enough to become solid: [I] The rainwater froze overnight, leaving the roads icy.
If you freeze food, you preserve it by storing it at a very low temperature.
Someone such as a police officer who says freeze is ordering you not to move except as the person tells you: [I] Freeze! Keep your hands up!
To freeze something such as pay or prices is to fix them at a particular level and not allow any increases: [T] The company has frozen salaries.
To freeze money or property is to officially and legally prevent it from being used or moved: [T] The government froze his assets.

freezenoun [C]

 us   /friz/
a period when the air temperature is low enough so that water will freeze: The first freeze didn’t come until mid-December.
A freeze is a temporary stopping of something: The company has imposed a wage/hiring freeze.
(Definition of freeze from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"freeze" in Business English

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freezeverb

uk   us   /friːz/ (froze, frozen)
[T] ECONOMICS, FINANCE to fix prices, income levels, interest rates, etc. at a particular level and not allow any increases: freeze wages/rates/taxes Mortgage lenders have agreed to freeze adjustable interest rates for some of the state's highest-risk borrowers.
[T] LAW, BANKING if a government or court freezes someone's bank account, money, assets etc. it legally prevents them from using any of it: Some of the prisoners' assets were frozen by order of the government. Officials said they will freeze 120 local bank accounts and place racketeering liens on numerous homes and businesses.
[I] IT if a computer freezes or a computer screen is frozen, it suddenly stops working and the screen will not change even when you use the keyboard or mouse: If your computer freezes, you may have to shut it down manually by holding the power button for several seconds.
[T] to officially stop an activity or process for a period of time: freeze production/sales/recruitment The world's biggest automaker announced that it will temporarily freeze production due to low demand.
Phrasal verbs

freezenoun [C]

uk   us   /friːz/
ECONOMICS a decision to fix prices, income levels, interest rates, etc. at a particular level and not allow any increases: a pay/price/interest rate/tax freeze To deal with the pension crisis, a two-year salary freeze has been imposed on the city's 11,000 employees.
an official decision to stop an activity from continuing for a period of time: They promised to halve the deficit through a domestic spending freeze and improving government efficiency. The temporary nuclear freeze has not impressed Washington hardliners.a hiring/recruitment freeze Hiring freezes and layoffs are likely to continue into the new year. a freeze on sth The organization was set up to campaign for a freeze on the growing of GM crops and animals.
LAW an official order, for example, from a judge or government, that prevents money or property from being used or moved: impose/put/place a freeze on sth A High Court judge placed a freeze on her worldwide assets.
See also
(Definition of freeze from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“freeze” in American English

“freeze” in Business English

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