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Meaning of “frequency” in the English Dictionary

"frequency" in British English

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frequencynoun

uk   /ˈfriː.kwən.si/  us   /ˈfriː.kwən.si/
  • frequency noun (HAPPENING)

[C or U] the ​number of ​times something ​happens within a ​particularperiod, or the ​fact of something ​happening often or a ​largenumber or ​times: Complaints about the frequency ofbusesrose in the last ​year. the ​increasing frequency ofterroristattacks It's not the ​duration of his ​absences from ​work so much as the frequency that ​worries me.
  • frequency noun (LIGHT/SOUND/RADIO)

[U] specialized physics the ​number of ​times that a ​wave, ​especially a ​light, ​sound, or ​radiowave, is ​produced within a ​particularperiod, ​especially one second: the frequency of ​light low frequency ​radiation The ​humanear cannot ​hear very high-frequency ​sounds.
[C] specialized media a ​particularnumber of ​radiowavesproduced in a second at which a ​radiosignal is ​broadcast: Do you ​know what frequency the BBC World Service is on?

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(Definition of frequency from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"frequency" in American English

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frequencynoun

 us   /ˈfri·kwən·si/
physics [C] the ​number of ​times that a ​wave is ​produced within a ​particularperiod, esp. within one second: Dogs can ​hear very high frequencies.
  • frequency noun (COMMON)

[U] the ​number of ​times something is ​repeated, or the ​fact of something ​happening often: Houses are ​sold here with ​greater frequency than in most other ​parts of the ​country.
(Definition of frequency from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"frequency" in Business English

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frequencynoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈfriːkwənsi/
the ​number of ​times something ​happens within a particular ​period, or the fact of something ​happening often or a large ​number of ​times: Once a week is a good frequency to back up all the ​data.the frequency of sth Cost-conscious ​retailers are ​reducing the frequency of ​cashcollections. We can surely do better in ​reducing the frequency and intensity of ​emergingmarketfinancialcrises.with greater/increasing frequency Skirmishes between ​privacyadvocates and those ​collectinginformation are occurring with ​increasing frequency. Some ​trustslimit the frequency with which a ​loan can be ​modified.
COMMUNICATIONS the ​number of ​times that a ​wave, especially a ​sound or radio ​wave, is ​produced within a particular ​period, especially one second: The transmitter ​sends out a ​pulse of ​sound at a frequency of 6 kilohertz.
(Definition of frequency from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“frequency” in British English

“frequency” in American English

“frequency” in Business English

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