friction Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “friction” in the English Dictionary

"friction" in British English

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frictionnoun [U]

uk   /ˈfrɪk.ʃən/  us   /ˈfrɪk.ʃən/
  • friction noun [U] (FORCE)

the force that makes it difficult for one object to slide along the surface of another or to move through a liquid or gas: When you rub your hands together the friction produces heat.
  • friction noun [U] (DISAGREEMENT)

disagreement or unfriendliness caused by people having different opinions: There's a lot of friction between my wife and my mother. Politics is a source of considerable friction in our family. Border clashes have led to increased friction between the two countries.
frictional
adjective uk   /ˈfrɪk.ʃən.əl/  us   /ˈfrɪk.ʃən.əl/
(Definition of friction from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"friction" in American English

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frictionnoun [U]

 us   /ˈfrɪk·ʃən/
  • friction noun [U] (FORCE)

physics the force that works against an object as it slides along the surface of another object or moves through a liquid or gas: A gasoline engine loses over 70 percent of its energy to friction and heat.
  • friction noun [U] (DISAGREEMENT)

disagreement or dislike caused by people having different opinions: There’s less friction in relationships when you use teamwork.
frictional
adjective [not gradable]  /ˈfrɪk·ʃə·nəl/ physics
frictionless
adjective  us   /ˈfrɪk·ʃən·ləs/ physics
(Definition of friction from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“friction” in British English

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