Meaning of “friction” in the English Dictionary

"friction" in British English

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frictionnoun [ U ]

uk /ˈfrɪk.ʃən/ us /ˈfrɪk.ʃən/

friction noun [ U ] (FORCE)

the force that makes it difficult for one object to slide along the surface of another or to move through a liquid or gas:

When you rub your hands together the friction produces heat.

friction noun [ U ] (DISAGREEMENT)

disagreement or unfriendliness caused by people having different opinions:

There's a lot of friction between my wife and my mother.
Politics is a source of considerable friction in our family.
Border clashes have led to increased friction between the two countries.
frictional
adjective uk /ˈfrɪk.ʃən.əl/ us /ˈfrɪk.ʃən.əl/

(Definition of “friction” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"friction" in American English

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frictionnoun [ U ]

us /ˈfrɪk·ʃən/

friction noun [ U ] (FORCE)

physics the force that works against an object as it slides along the surface of another object or moves through a liquid or gas:

A gasoline engine loses over 70 percent of its energy to friction and heat.

friction noun [ U ] (DISAGREEMENT)

disagreement or dislike caused by people having different opinions:

There’s less friction in relationships when you use teamwork.
frictional
adjective [ not gradable ] /ˈfrɪk·ʃə·nəl/ physics
frictionless
adjective us /ˈfrɪk·ʃən·ləs/ physics

(Definition of “friction” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)