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Meaning of “friendly” in the English Dictionary

"friendly" in British English

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friendlyadjective

uk   /ˈfrend.li/  us   /ˈfrend.li/
A2 behaving in a ​pleasant, ​kind way towards someone: a friendly ​face/​smile Our ​neighbours have always been very friendlyto/towards us. I'm on friendly terms with my daughter's ​teacher. Are you friendly with (= a ​friend of) Graham?
Opposite
A friendly ​place is ​pleasant and makes you ​feelhappy and ​comfortable: It's a friendly little ​restaurant.
A friendly ​game or ​argument is one that you ​play or have for ​pleasure and in ​order to ​practiseyourskills, ​rather than ​playing or ​arguingseriously with the ​aim of ​winning: We were having a friendly ​argument about ​politics. The ​teams are ​playing a friendly ​match on ​Sunday.
Friendly ​countries and friendly ​soldiers are ​ones who are not ​yourenemies and who are ​working or ​fighting with you.

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friendliness
noun [U] uk   /ˈfrend.li.nəs/  us   /ˈfrend.li.nəs/

friendlynoun [C]

uk   /ˈfrend.li/  us   /ˈfrend.li/ UK
a ​game that is ​played for ​enjoyment and in ​order to ​practise, not with the ​aim of ​winningpoints as ​part of a ​seriouscompetition: The ​rugbyclub has a friendly next ​week against the Giants.

-friendlysuffix

uk   / -frend.li/  us   / -frend.li/
(Definition of friendly from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"friendly" in American English

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friendlyadjective

 us   /ˈfrend·li/
having an ​attitude or ​acting in a way that ​shows that you like ​people and ​want them to like and ​trust you: They were friendly ​people. She had a ​bright, friendly ​smile.
If you ​describe a ​place as friendly, you ​mean that it is ​pleasant and ​comfortable: It’s a very friendly ​city.
If ​countries or ​organizations are friendly, they are ​willing to ​help each other: Sometimes an ​ambassador will get too friendly with the ​localdictator.
Friendly is also used as a ​combiningform to ​meaneasy to be ​comfortable with or not ​damaging: user-friendlytechnology a family-friendly ​film
(Definition of friendly from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"friendly" in Business English

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friendlyadjective

uk   us   /ˈfrendli/
WORKPLACE, FINANCE relating to ​situations in which the ​owners or directors of a ​company are ​willing to ​sell it to another ​company that ​wants to ​buy it: a friendly merger/offer/takeover The ​board is ​seeking a ​higherprice in ​exchange for ​entering into a friendly ​mergeragreement. The friendly ​takeover will instantly ​forcecompetitors to ​bring down their ​prices.
Compare
(often used in compounds) ​easy to use or suitable for ​members of a particular ​group to use: Their ​website is particularly friendly to use. a customer-friendlybank a child-friendlyworkingenvironment We need to continue to make the ​shoppingarea more pedestrian-friendly.
(Definition of friendly from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“friendly” in Business English

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