function Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “function” in the English Dictionary

"function" in British English

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functionnoun

uk   us   /ˈfʌŋk.ʃən/

function noun (PURPOSE)

B2 [C] the ​naturalpurpose (of something) or the ​duty (of a ​person): The function of the ​veins is to ​carryblood to the ​heart. I'm not ​quitesure what my function is within the ​company. A ​thermostat performs the function ofcontrollingtemperature.
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function noun (CEREMONY)

C1 [C] an ​officialceremony or a ​formalsocialevent, such as a ​party or a ​specialmeal, at which a lot of ​people are usually ​present: As a ​mayor, he has a lot of official functions to attend. I ​see her two or three ​times a ​year, usually at social functions.

function noun (WORK)

[U] the way in which something ​works or ​operates: It's a ​disease that ​affects the function of the ​nervoussystem. Studies ​suggest that ​regularintake of the ​vitaminsignificantlyimprovesbrain function.

function noun (COMPUTER)

[C] specialized computing a ​process that a ​computer or a ​computerprogram uses to ​complete a ​task: a ​search/​save/​sort function

function noun (RESULT)

a function of sth formal something that ​results from something ​else, or is the way it is because of something ​else: His ​success is a function of his having ​worked so hard. The ​lowtemperatures here are a function of the ​terrain as much as of the ​climate.

function noun (VALUE)

[C] specialized mathematics (in ​mathematics) a ​quantity whose ​valuedepends on another ​value and ​changes with that ​value: x is a function of y.

functionverb [I]

uk   us   /ˈfʌŋk.ʃən/
to ​work or ​operate: You'll ​soonlearn how the ​office functions. The ​television was functioning ​normally until ​yesterday. I'm so ​tired today, I can ​barely function.
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Phrasal verbs
(Definition of function from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"function" in American English

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functionnoun

 us   /ˈfʌŋk·ʃən/

function noun (PURPOSE)

[C/U] a ​purpose or duty, or the way something or someone ​works: [U] The function of the ​veins is to ​carryblood to the ​heart. [C] One of ​your functions as ​receptionist is to ​answer the ​phone.

function noun (MATHEMATICAL RELATIONSHIP)

mathematics [C] a ​relationship between two sets in which each ​part of the first set is ​connected with just one ​member of the second set in ​numberpairs

function noun (CEREMONY)

[C] a ​socialevent or ​officialceremony: Morse went to the ​WhiteHouse for a ​ceremonial function.

functionverb [I]

 us   /ˈfʌŋk·ʃən/

function verb [I] (PERFORM PURPOSE)

to ​perform the ​purpose of a ​particular thing, or to ​perform the duties of a ​particularperson: She ​quicklylearned how the ​office functions. I’m so ​tired today, I can ​barely function. Our ​sparebedroom also functions as a ​study (= is also used for that ​purpose).
(Definition of function from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"function" in Business English

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functionnoun

uk   us   /ˈfʌŋkʃən/
[C or U] the ​purpose that something has: The perfect marriage between ​productdesign and function ​account for the company’s ​success in the ​computermarket. A ​fundamental function of the Bank of England is the ​responsibility of ​carrying out ​monetarypolicyoperations.
[C or U] a ​job or ​task that someone or something does: My function is to ​helpcoordinateefficientcommunication between the ​departments. carry out/​perform a function
[C] HR a particular ​area of ​responsibility of a ​company: a sales/​marketing/​business functioncore/corporate functions Of all the ​core functions of most ​companies, ​innovation has arguably the most ​competitivevalue.
[C] IT a ​process which a ​computer or a ​softwareprogram uses to complete a ​task: a search/save/sort function The ​websitebenefits from a highly-efficient ​search function.
[C] an ​official occasion or ​eventattended by many ​people: a charity/​social/​work function
be a function of sth if something is a function of something else, it is ​produced as the ​result of that thing or ​process: The ​increasedavailability of ​part-timejobs is a function of the ​structuralchanges in the ​labourmarket.

functionverb [I]

uk   us   /ˈfʌŋkʃən/
to ​work correctly and as expected: function ​effectively/properly/well Flights were delayed because the ​airportcomputersystem was not functioning.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of function from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “function”
in Korean 기능…
in Arabic عَمَل, وَظيفة…
in Malaysian fungsi…
in French fonction…
in Russian функция, назначение, прием…
in Chinese (Traditional) 目的, 功能,用途, 職責…
in Italian funzione…
in Turkish işlev, büyük resmi davet/tören/parti…
in Polish funkcja, rola, uroczystość…
in Spanish función…
in Vietnamese chức năng…
in Portuguese função…
in Thai หน้าที่…
in German die Funktion…
in Catalan funció…
in Japanese 機能…
in Chinese (Simplified) 目的, 功能,用途, 职责…
in Indonesian fungsi…
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