Meaning of “gate” in the English Dictionary

"gate" in British English

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gatenoun [ C ]

uk /ɡeɪt/ us /ɡeɪt/

gate noun [ C ] (STRUCTURE)

A2 a part of a fence or outside wall that is fixed at one side and opens and closes like a door, usually made of metal or wooden strips

a similar device that slides across an opening, often folding into a smaller space as it is opened:

The lift won't move if the safety gate isn't shut properly.

B1 a part of an airport where travellers are allowed to get on or off a particular aircraft:

All passengers for flight LH103 please proceed to gate 16.

More examples

  • The paths all converge at the main gate of the park.
  • The sign on the gate said 'Private Property - No Admittance.'
  • Passengers for Madrid should proceed to gate 26 for boarding.
  • Please shut the gate.
  • An angry crowd surged through the gates of the president's palace.

(Definition of “gate” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"gate" in American English

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gatenoun [ C ]

us /ɡeɪt/

a section of a fence or outer wall that can swing open to let you through:

I pushed open the gate and went into the backyard.

A gate is also the door at an airport that you go through to get on an aircraft:

All passengers for flight 103 please proceed to gate D4.

(Definition of “gate” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"gate" in Business English

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gatenoun

uk /ɡeɪt/ us

[ C ] TRANSPORT a part of an airport where travellers are allowed to get on or off an aircraft:

Our MD-80 left at 8:14 p.m. from Gate C33.
Delays that are caused by gate agents are assigned to customer service.

[ C or U ] COMMERCE the number of people that go to see a large event, or the amount of money people pay to see it:

The gate for the event was a reported $2.6 million.

(Definition of “gate” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)