Meaning of “gaze” in the English Dictionary

"gaze" in British English

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gazeverb [ I usually + adv/prep ]

uk /ɡeɪz/ us /ɡeɪz/

B2 to look at something or someone for a long time, especially in surprise or admiration, or because you are thinking about something else:

Annette gazed admiringly at Warren as he spoke.
He spends hours gazing out of the window when he should be working.

More examples

  • He gazed out over the emptiness of the moors.
  • He gazed at her, his eyes full of longing.
  • She gazed in admiration at his broad, muscular shoulders.
  • She was gazing out the window, rocking rhythmically to and fro.
  • The women sitting opposite us were gazing admiringly at baby Joe.

gazenoun [ S ]

uk /ɡeɪz/ us /ɡeɪz/

C2 a long look, usually of a particular kind:

a steady gaze
literary As I looked out, my gaze fell on a small child by the road.

More examples

  • Her gaze fell upon a small box at the back of the shop.
  • I could feel his malevolent gaze as I walked away.
  • I averted my gaze while he dressed.
  • He turned a cold, reptilian gaze on me.
  • She returned his gaze steadily.

(Definition of “gaze” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"gaze" in American English

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gazeverb [ I ]

us /ɡeɪz/

to look at something or someone for a long time, esp. in surprise, admiration, or because you are thinking about something else:

He spends hours gazing out of the window when he should be working.
gaze
noun [ U ] us /ɡeɪz/

I felt his gaze on me as I walked out the door.

(Definition of “gaze” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)