Meaning of “gesture” in the English Dictionary

"gesture" in English

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gesturenoun [ C ]

uk /ˈdʒes.tʃər/ us /ˈdʒes.tʃɚ/

gesture noun [ C ] (MOVEMENT)

C1 a movement of the hands, arms, or head, etc. to express an idea or feeling:

The prisoner raised his fist in a gesture of defiance as he was led out of the courtroom.
She made a rude gesture at the other driver.

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gesture noun [ C ] (SYMBOLIC ACT)

C1 an action that expresses your feelings or intentions, although it might have little practical effect:

The government donated £500,000 as a gesture of goodwill.
Eating boiled potatoes instead of chips was his only gesture towards healthy eating.

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gestureverb [ I ]

uk /ˈdʒes.tʃər/ us /ˈdʒes.tʃɚ/

C2 to use a gesture to express or emphasize something:

When he asked where the children were, she gestured vaguely in the direction of the beach.
He made no answer but walked on, gesturing for me to follow.

(Definition of “gesture” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"gesture" in American English

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gesturenoun [ C ]

us /ˈdʒes·tʃər/

gesture noun [ C ] (MOVEMENT)

a movement of the body, hands, arms, or head to express an idea or feeling:

He made a rude gesture to the crowd after his tennis match.

gesture noun [ C ] (SYMBOLIC ACT)

an action that expresses your feelings or intentions, although it might have little practical effect:

Her warm thank-you note was a nice gesture.
gesture
verb [ I ] us /ˈdʒes·tʃər/

When I asked where the children were, she gestured toward the beach.

(Definition of “gesture” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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gesture

Preparing the economically least privileged regions for the 21st century is no longer a visionary gesture, it is a current priority.
Nothing could be further from the truth, indeed the least developed countries have very little to gain from such a gesture.
The elimination of trade-distorting agricultural export subsidies in 2013 is three years later than hoped for, and amounts to a symbolic gesture to the world’s poorest farmers.
Well, this was not a merely symbolic or ritual gesture: that day, almost a third of the large, huge public debt of these countries was discharged.
We should not lose sight of that, because in that case, a new authority, whatever it was called, would just be a smokescreen and a token gesture.
Is this simply a political gesture?
Lastly, a strong gesture from the major powers could perhaps convince countries that are currently acquiring nuclear knowhow to abandon their projects.
We will only make such a gesture, should this prove necessary, in the context of an overall balance, which has not yet been fully achieved.
Even if, as proposed, aid is increased, it is just crumbs, a philanthropic gesture, in the face of the real needs of developing countries.
By this clear gesture, we wanted to underline the critical importance of an agreement between the government parties on the necessary steps leading to elections in the country.