Meaning of “get away” in the English Dictionary

british dictionary

"get away" in British English

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get away

phrasal verb with get uk /ɡet/ us /ɡet/ verb present participle getting, past tense got, past participle got or US usually gotten

B2 to leave or escape from a person or place, often when it is difficult to do this:

We walked to the next beach to get away from the crowds.
I'll get away from work as soon as I can.

B2 to go somewhere to have a holiday, often because you need to rest:

I just need to get away for a few days.
We've decided to go to hiking in the mountains to get away from it all.
get away (with you)! UK old-fashioned informal US get out!

said when you do not believe or agree with what someone is saying:

"Ralph painted that, you know." "Get away!"

More examples

  • I had to get away from the party. It was awful.
  • They got away from burning car before it exploded.
  • I finally got away from work at eight o'clock.
  • We're getting away in January for a skiing holiday.
  • By the time the police arrived, the robbers had got away.

(Definition of “get away” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"get away" in American English

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get away

phrasal verb with get us /ɡet/ verb present participle getting, past participle gotten /ˈɡɑt·ən/ got /ɡɑt/

to leave or escape:

Wouldn’t it be nice to get away for a weekend?

(Definition of “get away” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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