Meaning of “get on” in the English Dictionary

"get on" in British English

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get on

phrasal verb with get uk /ɡet/ us /ɡet/ verb present participle getting, past tense got, past participle got or US usually gotten

(RELATIONSHIP)

B1 UK US also UK get along to have a good relationship:

We're getting on much better now that we don't live together.
He doesn't get on with his daughter.

More examples

  • We haven't been getting on recently.
  • It's important that you get on with your colleagues.
  • Do you get on with your brother?
  • They got on better when they were children.
  • He gets on with everyone.

(MANAGE)

B1 UK US also UK get along to manage or deal with a situation, especially successfully:

How are you getting on in your new home?
We're getting on quite well with the decorating.

More examples

  • How are you getting on with your essay?
  • How are you getting on with your new car?
  • He seems to be getting on well in his new job.
  • How did you get on with the questions I set you?
  • I'll have to wait for the results to see how I got on with my exams.

(OLD)

be getting on informal

More examples

  • He must be getting on a bit now.
  • My dad would love to help but he's getting on a bit now.
  • I should think he's into his eighties by now - he's getting on.
  • You forget - I'm getting on. I'm not as young as I used to be.
  • I suppose they're getting on now and they've had various friends die.

to be getting old:

He's getting on (a bit) - he'll be 76 next birthday.

(Definition of “get on” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"get on" in American English

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get on

phrasal verb with get us /ɡet/ verb present participle getting, past participle gotten /ˈɡɑt·ən/ got /ɡɑt/

to grow old:

Uncle Meade’s getting on in years – he’s 76.

(Definition of “get on” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

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