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Meaning of “get” in the English Dictionary

"get" in British English

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getverb

uk   /ɡet/ us   /ɡet/ present participle getting, past tense got, past participle got or US usually gotten
  • get verb (OBTAIN)

A1 [T] to obtain, buy, or earn something: He went to the shop to get some milk.UK I think she gets about £40,000 a year. We stopped on the way to get some breakfast. I managed to get all three suitcases for under $200. How much did he get for his car? (= How much money did he sell it for?) Where did you get your shoes from?
A1 [T] to receive or be given something: UK I got quite a surprise when I saw her with short hair. When did you get the news about Sam? I got a phone call from Phil last night. What grade did he get for the exam? I got the impression that they'd rather be alone. What did you get for your birthday? We don't get much snow (= it does not often snow) here. I managed to get a glimpse of him (= see him for a moment) through the crowds. If you get a moment (= have time available), could you help me fill in that form? She gets such pleasure from her garden. If you can get some time off work, we could finish the decorating. I can never get her to myself (= be alone with her) because she's always surrounded by people.
A2 [T] to go somewhere and bring back someone or something: Let me go get my glasses. [+ two objects] Can I get you a drink?
[T] to take someone or something into your possession by force: Have the police got the man who did it yet? Your cat got a bird this morning!

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  • get verb (REACH)

A1 [I usually + adv/prep, T] to reach or arrive at a particular place: We hadn't even got as far as London when the car broke down. What time does he normally get home (from work)? If you get to the restaurant before us, just wait at the bar.
[I usually + adv/prep] to reach a particular stage, condition, or time: You earn loads of money if you get to the top in that profession. It got to Thursday and she still hadn't heard any news.informal I'm getting to the stage now where I just want to give up.
get far/somewhere/anywhere
to make progress or to improve: She's taking flute lessons, but she really doesn't seem to be getting anywhere with it. It's been hard settling in, but I feel like I'm getting somewhere at last.

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  • get verb (BECOME ILL WITH)

B1 [T] to become ill with a disease, virus, etc.: I got food poisoning at that cheap little seafood restaurant. Kids get all kinds of bugs at school.

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  • get verb (START TO BE)

B1 [L] to become or start to be: He gets really upset if you mention his baldness. Is your cold getting any better? Your coffee's getting cold. After a while you get used to all the noise. You're getting to be such a big boy, aren't you! [+ to infinitive] How did you get to be a belly dancer?
get going/moving C2 informal
to start to go or move: We'd better get moving or we'll be late.

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  • get verb (CAUSE)

B1 [T] to cause something to happen, or cause someone or something to do something: [+ adj] She had to get the kids ready for school. [+ past participle] I'm trying to get this article finished by Thursday. We get our groceries delivered. [+ -ing verb] Were you able to get the copy machine working? [+ to infinitive] I can't get my computer to work!
B2 [T + obj + to infinitive ] to persuade someone to do something: Why don't you get Nicole to come to the party?
[T + past participle] to do something to something or someone without intending to or by accident: He got his bag caught in the train doors as they were closing. I always get the two youngest sisters' names confused.

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  • get verb (MOVE)

B1 [I usually + adv/prep] to move to a different place or into a different position: I hit my head as I was getting into the car. Get out of here now or I'll call the police. The bed is too wide - we'll never get it through the door. Getting up the ladder was easy enough - it was coming down that was the problem. He got down on his knees and asked me to marry him!

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  • get verb (TRAVEL)

A1 [T] to travel somewhere in a train, bus, or other vehicle: Shall we get a taxi to the station?

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  • get verb (UNDERSTAND/HEAR)

B2 [T] to understand or hear something: I didn't get what he said because the music was so loud. I told that joke to Sophia, but she didn't get it.

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  • I didn't get that joke he told - did you?
  • Sorry, I still don't get it. You'll have to explain.
  • I didn't get that. Could you say it again?
  • I didn't get half of what he said because he talks so fast.
  • Did you get that? I hadn't a clue what he said.
  • get verb (PREPARE)

[T] to prepare a meal: I'll put the kids to bed while you're getting dinner ready.

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  • get verb (CONFUSE)

[T] informal to confuse someone and make them completely unable to understand or explain: Give him a technical question - that'll really get him!
you've got me there! informal
something that you say when you do not know the answer to a question: "How many ounces in a kilo?" "You've got me there."
  • get verb (HIT)

[T] to hit someone, especially with a bullet or something thrown: The bullet got her in the leg.
(Definition of get from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"get" in American English

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getverb

us   /ɡet/ present participle getting, past participle gotten /ˈɡɑt·ən/ got /ɡɑt/
  • get verb (OBTAIN)

[T] to take something into your possession, or have something happen that you accept or receive: He climbed over the fence to get his ball back. Monique raised her hand to get the teacher’s attention. Can I get you a drink? Dad keeps telling me to get a job. What did you get on the test (= What mark did you receive)? I think she gets (= earns) about $10 an hour. We don’t get much snow in this part of the country (= It does not often snow).
[T] To get something often means to buy or pay for it: He went to the store to get milk.
  • get verb (BECOME)

[L] to become or start to be: Your coffee is getting cold. He’s gotten so big, I hardly recognized him. They’re getting married later this year. Tom got lost in the woods. What time do you get off work? We’d better get going/moving or we’ll be late.
  • get verb (BECOME ILL WITH)

[T] to become ill with a disease: Everyone seems to be getting the flu.
  • get verb (CAUSE)

[T] to cause something to be done or persuade someone to do something: The bed is too wide – we’ll never get it through the door. I can’t get this printer to work!
  • get verb (PREPARE)

[T] to prepare a meal: Why don’t you get supper ready?
  • get verb (MOVE)

[always + adv/prep] to move in a particular direction: [I] Get away from that wet paint! [I] He got down on his hands and knees to look for his contact lens. [T] Her throat was so sore that she had trouble getting the medicine down (= swallowing it). [I] I hit my head as I was getting into the car. [M] Momma said we have to get these wet clothes off (= remove them). [T] Get your feet off the couch (= move them off it).
[always + adv/prep] To get off a road when you are driving means to turn onto another road: [I] Get off the expressway at exit 43.
[always + adv/prep] To get off a train, bus, or aircraft is to leave it: [I] Get off at Union Station.
  • get verb (TRAVEL)

[T] to go into a vehicle or aircraft for traveling: We could call for a taxi or get the bus.
  • get verb (ARRIVE)

[I always + adv/prep] to arrive at a place or reach a stage in a process: We only got as far as Denver when the car broke down. What time does he normally get home from work? We’re not getting very far (= not advancing) with this computer program, are we?
  • get verb (UNDERSTAND)

[T] to understand: I think I got the general idea of the chapter. The music was loud and I didn’t get what he said. I never said he was mean – you’ve got it all wrong (= you are confused about this matter).
  • get verb (CALCULATE)

[T] to calculate the answer to a mathematical problem: What do you get if you divide 20 by 4?
  • get verb (ANSWER)

[T] to answer a ringing telephone, a knock at the door, etc.: Hey, Juan, someone’s at the door – would you get it, please?
  • get verb (HIT)

[T] to hit someone, esp. with something thrown or a bullet: My first throw missed, but the second got him in the leg.
  • get verb (ANNOY)

[T] infml to cause someone to feel slightly angry: It gets me when I have to both cook dinner and clean the dishes.
  • get verb (CAUSE EMOTIONS)

[T] infml to have an emotional effect on someone: That scene in the movie, when the father and daughter are reunited, always gets me.
(Definition of get from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"get" in Business English

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getverb

uk   /ɡet/ us   -tt-, got, got, or US gotten
[T] to obtain, buy, or earn something: I think she gets about $40,000 a year.get sth for sth How much did he get for his business when he sold it?
[T] to receive or be given something: get sth from sb/sth The results we got from our market research team indicate that potential customers seem to like the new ad campaign.
[I, usually + adv/prep] to reach a particular stage, condition, or time: get to sth Your earnings increase hugely if you get to the top in the legal profession.
[T] informal to pay for something: I'll get the bill.
(Definition of get from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“get” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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