go ahead Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “go ahead” in the English Dictionary

"go ahead" in British English

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go ahead

phrasal verb with go uk   /ɡəʊ/  us   /ɡoʊ/ verb (present participle going, past tense went, past participle gone)
B2 to ​start to do something: We've ​receivedpermission to go ​ahead with the ​musicfestival in ​spite of ​opposition from ​localresidents. I got so ​fed up with ​waiting for him to do it that I just went ​ahead and did it myself.B2 informal said to someone in ​order to give them ​permission to ​start to do something: "Could I ​ask you a ​ratherpersonalquestion?" "Sure, go ​ahead." If an ​event goes ​ahead, it ​happens: The ​festival is now going ​ahead as ​planned.

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go-aheadnoun [S]

uk   /ˈɡəʊ.ə.hed/  us   /ˈɡoʊ-/
an ​occasion when ​permission is given for someone to ​start doing something or for an ​event or ​activity to ​happen: The ​government has given the go-ahead for a multi-billion ​pound road-building ​project. We're ​ready to ​start but we're still ​waiting to get the go-ahead from ​ourheadoffice.
See also

go-aheadadjective

uk   /ˈɡəʊ.ə.hed/  us   /ˈɡoʊ-/
(Definition of go ahead from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"go ahead" in American English

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go ahead

phrasal verb with go  us   /ɡoʊ/ verb (present tense goes, present participle going, past tense went  /went/ , past participle gone  /ɡɔn, ɡɑn/ )
to ​begin or ​continue with a ​plan or ​activity without ​waiting, esp. after a ​delay: The ​meeting will go ahead as ​planned.

go-aheadnoun [U]

 us   /ˈɡoʊ·əˌhed/
permission or ​notice that an ​activity may ​begin: We’re ​ready to ​start the ​project but we’re still ​waiting for the go-ahead.
(Definition of go ahead from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"go ahead" in Business English

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go ahead

phrasal verb with go uk   us   /ɡəʊ/ verb (going, went, gone)
[I] to ​start to do something: go ahead with sth The United ​States can go ​ahead with the ​program with or without Canada's ​participation.
[I] if an ​event goes ​ahead, it ​happens: The ​companysettled out of ​court on the day before the ​trial was ​due to go ​ahead.

go-aheadnoun [S]

uk   us  
permission to ​start doing something or for an ​event or ​activity to ​happen: the go-ahead to do sth Developers got the go-ahead to ​turn 42 ​acres of ​industrialland into ​housingdevelopment.the go-ahead for sth Airbus ​wants half a ​dozenlaunchcustomerssigned up before it gives the go-ahead for the new ​aircraft.get/give/receive the go-ahead It ​applied for ​permission to ​launch the ​fund in December and received the go-ahead in May.
(Definition of go ahead from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of go ahead?
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“go ahead” in British English

“go ahead” in American English

“go ahead” in Business English

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