grace Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “grace” in the English Dictionary

"grace" in British English

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gracenoun

uk   /ɡreɪs/ us   /ɡreɪs/
  • grace noun (APPROVAL)

[U] formal approval or kindness, especially (in the Christian religion) that is freely given by God to all humans: Betty believed that it was through divine grace that her husband had recovered from his illness.
by the grace of God formal
through the kindness or help of God: By the grace of God, the pilot managed to land the damaged plane safely.
  • grace noun (PRAYER)

[C or U] a prayer said by Christians before a meal to thank God for the food: The children always say grace at dinnertime.

graceverb [T]

uk   /ɡreɪs/ us   /ɡreɪs/
C2 to be in a place, on a thing etc. and make it look more attractive: Her face has graced the covers of magazines across the world.
grace sb with your presence
to honour people by taking part in something: We are delighted that the mayor will be gracing us with his presence at our annual dinner.humorous So you've finally decided to grace us with your presence, have you? (= You are late.)

Gracenoun

uk   /ɡreɪs/ us   /ɡreɪs/
(Definition of grace from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"grace" in American English

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gracenoun [U]

us   /ɡreɪs/
  • grace noun [U] (BEAUTY)

simple beauty of movement or form: The skaters moved over the ice with effortless grace.
  • grace noun [U] (PLEASANTNESS)

the charming quality of being polite and pleasant, or a willingness to be fair and to forgive: She always handles her clients with tact and grace.
  • grace noun [U] (RELIGION)

a prayer of thanks to God that is said before and sometimes after a meal: Before we eat, I want to ask Cory to say grace.
Grace is also approval or protection given by God: By the grace of God, I hope to live for many years.
  • grace noun [U] (TIME)

an added period of time allowed before something must be done or paid: The landlord gave us a week’s grace to pay the rent.
graceful
adjective us   /ˈɡreɪs·fəl/
The dancers formed graceful, whirling combinations.
graceful
adjective us   /ˈɡreɪs·fəl/
I want to make a graceful exit when it’s time to leave.
gracefully
adverb us   /ˈɡreɪs·fə·li/
He gracefully skis down the slopes.
gracefully
adverb us   /ˈɡreɪs·fə·li/
A lot of people grow old gracefully.
(Definition of grace from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"grace" in Business English

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gracenoun [U]

uk   /ɡreɪs/ us  
extra time after the normal date that a payment should be made, work should be finished, etc. during which there is no punishment for being late: give sb a month's/a week's/two weeks', etc. grace The bank gives customers a week's grace before charging a late fee. China will give foreign companies up to a two-year grace period before taxing their capital goods imports.
See also
(Definition of grace from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of grace?
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