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Meaning of “grade” in the English Dictionary

"grade" in British English

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gradenoun [C]

uk   /ɡreɪd/ us   /ɡreɪd/
  • grade noun [C] (LEVEL)

B2 a level of quality, size, importance, etc.: He's suffering from some kind of low-grade (= slight) infection, which he can't seem to get rid of. There's some really high-grade (= high quality) musicianship on this recording. Bill has been on the same grade (= his job has been of the same level of importance, or he has had the same level of pay) for several years now.
B1 a number or letter that shows how good someone's work or performance is: Steve never studies, but he always gets good grades.UK Carla got a grade A in German.
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  • grade noun [C] (SCHOOL)

A2 US a school class or group of classes in which all the children are of a similar age or ability: Jackie is in the sixth grade.

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  • grade noun [C] (SLOPE)

US a gradient : The next hill has a really steep grade.

gradeverb [T]

uk   /ɡreɪd/ us   /ɡreɪd/
(Definition of grade from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"grade" in American English

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gradenoun [C]

us   /ɡreɪd/
  • grade noun [C] (MEASURE/MARK)

a measure of the quality of a student’s performance, usually represented by the letters A (the best) through F (the worst): She always gets good grades.
A grade is also a measure or mark of quality, amount, or degree: high-grade musicianship He’s suffering from a low-grade infection.
  • grade noun [C] (SCHOOL)

a school class or group of classes in which all the children are of a similar age or ability: James is in the seventh grade this year.
  • grade noun [C] (SLOPE)

the degree of slope of land or of a road or path: In hilly San Francisco, many streets have a steep grade.

gradeverb [T]

us   /ɡreɪd/
  • grade verb [T] (MEASURE/MARK)

to judge and give a mark to a student, exam, etc.: The essays were graded on clarity of expression.
To grade is also to separate things according to quality or size: Eggs are usually graded by size.
(Definition of grade from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"grade" in Business English

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gradenoun [C]

uk   /ɡreɪd/ us  
BANKING a letter or combination of letters used by ratings agencies to show how certain they are that a loan will be paid back by the person or organization that borrowed the money: Bonds which are rated A are considered as upper-medium grade obligations.
PRODUCTION one of the levels of quality given to a particular product or substance : March futures on commercial grade coffee closed at $1.04 per pound Friday.high/low grade Technicians carefully loaded new fuel rods of high grade uranium into the cooling water.aircraft/human/weapons, etc. grade The scooters are made from aircraft grade aluminium alloy and weigh just 2.76kg.
HR a level or division within an organization or system: The administrative grade, recruited from top-quality university graduates, prepares policy advice for ministers. a pay/salary grade
make the grade
to be as good as expected or as good as is necessary: Many of the online shops simply failed to make the grade.

gradeverb [T]

uk   /ɡreɪd/ us   PRODUCTION, HR
to judge the quality of a product, substance, or organization, or the performance of an employee: The fibre is graded and packed into bales for transport to factories for spinning, dying, and milling.be graded on sth He said that principals and superintendents would be graded on leadership and school performance.be graded for sth Inside the world's largest covered building, the flowers are graded for quality and catalogued by computer.
(Definition of grade from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“grade” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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