ground Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “ground” in the English Dictionary

"ground" in British English

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groundnoun

uk   us   /ɡraʊnd/

ground noun (LAND)

the ground [S]
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B1 the ​surface of the earth: I ​sat down on the ground.
B2 [U] soil: soft/​stony ground The ground was ​frozen hard and was ​impossible to ​dig.B1 [C] an ​area of ​land used for a ​particularpurpose or ​activity: a ​football ground The ​lake has ​become a ​dumping ground for ​toxicchemicals. skillslearnt on the ​training ground (= ​place where ​sportsteamspractise)grounds [plural] C2 the ​gardens and ​land that ​surround a ​building and often have a ​wall or ​fence around them: We went for a ​walk around the ​hospital grounds.

ground noun (CAUSE)

C2 [C usually plural] a ​reason, ​cause, or ​argument: She is ​suing the ​company on grounds ofunfairdismissal.UK Do you have any ground forsuspecting them? [+ to infinitive] We have grounds tobelieve that you have been ​lying to us. [+ that] He ​refused to ​answer on the grounds that the ​questionviolated his ​rights to ​privacy.
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ground noun (AREA OF KNOWLEDGE)

C2 [U] an ​area of ​knowledge or ​experience: When the ​conversationturns to ​politics he's on ​familiar ground (= he ​knows a lot about this ​subject). Once we'd ​found some common ground (= things we both ​knew about) we got along very well together. The ​lectures covered a lot of ground (= ​includedinformation on many different ​subjects). I ​enjoyed her first ​novel, but I ​felt in the second she was going over the same ground (= ​dealing with the same ​area of ​experience).
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ground noun (WIRE)

[C usually singular] US (UK earth) a ​wire that makes a ​connection between a ​piece of ​electricalequipment and the ground, so the ​user is ​protected from ​feeling an ​electricshock if the ​equipmentdevelops a ​fault

ground noun (COFFEE)

grounds [plural] the ​smallgrains of ​coffeeleft at the ​bottom of a ​cup or other ​container that has had ​coffee in it
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groundverb

uk   us   /ɡraʊnd/

ground verb (GRIND)

past simple and past participle of grind

ground verb (KEEP ON LAND)

be grounded If a ​ship is grounded, it cannot ​move because it has ​hitsolid ground: The ​oiltanker was grounded on a ​sandbank. [T often passive] If ​aircraft are grounded, they are ​prevented from ​flying or ​ordered not to ​fly: The ​snowstormmeant that all ​planes were grounded.

ground verb (PUNISH)

[T] to forbid (= ​refuse to ​allow) a ​child or ​youngperson from going out as a ​punishment: My ​parents grounded me for a ​week.

ground verb (PUT WIRE)

[T usually passive] US (UK earth) to ​connect a ​piece of ​electricalequipment to the ground with a ​wire: You could get a ​nastyshock from that ​waterheater if it isn't grounded ​properly.

ground verb (CAUSE)

be grounded in sth formal to be ​basedfirmly on something: Fiction should be grounded in ​reality. Most ​phobias are grounded in ​childhoodexperiences.
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(Definition of ground from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"ground" in American English

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ground

 us   /ɡrɑʊnd/

ground (CRUSH)

past simple and past participle of grind

groundnoun

 us   /ɡrɑʊnd/

ground noun (LAND)

[U] the ​surface of the ​earth or of a ​piece of ​land: We ​laid a ​blanket on the ground for ​ourpicnic.

ground noun (AREA OF KNOWLEDGE)

[U] an ​area of ​knowledge or ​experience; a ​subject: This ​teacher just ​keeps going over the same ground again and again.

ground noun (CAUSE)

[C usually pl] a ​reason, ​cause, or ​argument: [+ that clause] He ​refused to ​answer on the grounds that he’d ​promised to ​keep it ​secret.

ground noun (WIRE)

[C] a ​connection between a ​piece of ​electricalequipment and the ​earth, or a ​wire that makes this ​connection [C] A ground is also an ​object that ​holds a very ​largenumber of electron s, and can ​accept or ​supply more when there is an ​electriccurrent.

groundverb [T]

 us   /ɡrɑʊnd/

ground verb [T] (PUNISH)

infml to ​punish an ​olderchild by not ​allowing the ​child to go out or be ​involved in ​socialactivities: My ​parents grounded me for a ​week.

ground verb [T] (CAUSE)

to have a ​reason, ​cause, or ​argument for ​youractions or ​beliefs: His ​beliefs are grounded in his ​experience.

ground verb [T] (LAND)

to put or ​keep on the ground: All ​flights have been grounded because of the ​snowstorm.
(Definition of ground from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"ground" in Business English

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groundnoun

uk   us   /ɡraʊnd/
[C, usually plural] a reason for something: on (the) grounds of sth The ​doctorrefused to ​surrender patient ​records on grounds of ​confidentiality.on the grounds that Researchers ​shut down the ​trial on the grounds that the vaccine was proving ineffectivegrounds for sth Only 13 of the ​contractsexaminedlistedincompetence as legitimate grounds fordismissal.on health/environmental/legal grounds The college was ​shut on ​health and ​safety grounds.
drive/run/work sb into the ground to make someone ​work very hard, especially so that they become ill or extremely tired: Although we ​worked everyone into the ground, we didn't get the ​job done in ​time. They were ​running themselves into the ground.
drive/run/work sth into the ground to use something so much that it ​breaks or ​stopsworking: They decided to ​run the ​car into the ground instead of ​changing it.
gain/make ground to become more popular or ​successful: Despite making ground within her own ​party, she still has to watch her back.gain/make ground on sb The ​searchengine is continuing to ​gain ground on the ​marketleader. FINANCE to ​increase in ​value: The ​shares have ​steadily made ground.gain/make ground against sth The ​Euro continued to ​gain ground against the ​pound and the ​dollar through the ​course of the week.
get off the ground if a ​project or ​activity gets off the ground, it ​starts or ​starts to be ​successful: There is a difference between a ​project which never gets off the ground and one which suddenly goes ​bad.
get sth off the ground to ​start a ​project or ​activity or to ​start making it ​successful: A lot more ​money will be ​required to get this ​project off the ground.
give/lose ground to become less popular or ​successful: Smaller ​parties always ​lose ground in ​elections.give/lose ground to sb The ​firm is continuing to give ground to its ​foreignrivals.

groundverb [T]

uk   us   /ɡraʊnd/ TRANSPORT
to prevent a ​ship or ​aircraft from sailing or ​flying: The ​badweathermeant that ​helicopters were grounded.
(Definition of ground from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“ground” in Business English

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