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Meaning of “grow” in the English Dictionary

"grow" in British English

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growverb

uk   /ɡrəʊ/  us   /ɡroʊ/ (grew, grown)
  • grow verb (INCREASE)

A2 [I or L or T] to ​increase in ​size or ​amount, or to ​become more ​advanced or ​developed: Children grow so ​quickly. This ​plant grows ​best in the ​shade. She's grown three ​centimetres this ​year. Football's ​popularitycontinues to grow. The ​labourforce is ​expected to grow by two ​percent next ​year. The ​maledeer grows ​large, ​branchinghorns called ​antlers.
B1 [I or T] If ​yourhair or ​nails grow, or if you grow them, they ​becomelonger: Lottie ​wants to grow her ​hairlong. Are you growing a ​beard? Wow, ​your hair's grown!
A2 [I] If a ​plant grows in a ​particularplace, it ​exists and ​develops there: There were ​roses growing up against the ​wall.
A2 [T] If you grow a ​plant, you put it in the ​ground and take ​care of it, usually in ​order to ​sell it: The ​villagers grow ​coffee and ​maize to ​sell in the ​market.
[T] to make a ​businessbigger by ​increasingsales, ​employing more ​people, etc.: We ​aim to grow the ​company by giving the ​customer a ​betterdeal.

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  • grow verb (BECOME)

grow tired, old, calm, etc.

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B2 to ​graduallybecometired, ​old, ​calm, etc.: He grew ​bored of the ​countryside. Growing ​old is so ​awful.
grow to do sth
to ​graduallystart to do something: I've grown to like her over the ​months.
(Definition of grow from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"grow" in American English

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growverb

 us   /ɡroʊ/ (past tense grew  /ɡru/ , past participle grown  /ɡroʊn/ )
  • grow verb (INCREASE)

[I/T] to ​increase in ​size or ​amount, or to ​allow or ​encourage something to ​increase in ​size or to ​become more ​advanced or ​developed: [I] The ​population is growing ​rapidly. [I] She’s grown a lot since we last ​saw her. [T] He ​began to grow a ​beard. [I] The ​economy is ​expected to grow by 2% next ​year.
  • grow verb (DEVELOP)

[I/T] to ​provide a ​plant with the ​conditions it ​needs to ​develop, or to ​develop from a ​seed or ​smallplant: [I] This ​plant grows ​best in the ​shade. [T] We’re growing some ​herbs on the ​windowsill.
  • grow verb (BECOME)

to ​developgradually, or to ​start to do something ​gradually: [L] I grew too ​old to be ​interested. [+ to infinitive] She has grown to like him.
(Definition of grow from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"grow" in Business English

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growverb

uk   us   /ɡrəʊ/ (grew, grown)
[I] to ​increase in ​size or ​amount, or to become more ​advanced or ​developed: The ​company is exploring the ​idea of acquisitions as a way to grow.grow by sth The ​labourforce is expected to grow by 2% next ​year.grow from sth to sth The ​number of ​stores in the town has grown from 80 to over 150.grow at a rate of sth Sales have grown at a ​rate of 16.2% ​annually since 2008. to grow rapidly/​steadily/significantly
[T] to ​develop something, so that its ​amount, ​size, or ​level of ​successincreases: grow a company/business The ​loan will be used to ​buy the ​machinery we need to grow the ​company.grow revenue/market share/sales The Chinese ​companies grew their ​revenue by 53% last ​year. This ​money is going to ​projects that will ​createjobs and ​helpgrow the ​economy.
[T] PRODUCTION if you grow a particular ​plant or ​crop, you ​plant it and take ​care of it, usually in ​order to ​sell it: We grow ​organic fruit and vegetables.
(Definition of grow from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“grow” in British English

“grow” in American English

“grow” in Business English

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