guarantee Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “guarantee” in the English Dictionary

"guarantee" in British English

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guaranteenoun

uk   /ˌɡær.ənˈtiː/ us   /ˌɡer.ənˈtiː/
B2 [C or U] a promise that something will be done or will happen, especially a written promise by a company to repair or change a product that develops a fault within a particular period of time: The system costs £99.95 including shipping and handling and a twelve-month guarantee. The TV comes with/has a two-year guarantee. a money-back guarantee [+ that] The United Nations has demanded a guarantee from the army that food convoys will not be attacked. [+ (that)] There is no guarantee (that) the discussions will lead to a deal. A product as good as that is a guarantee of commercial success (= it is certain to be successful). The shop said they would replace the television since it was still under guarantee.
[C] a formal agreement to take responsibility for something, such as the payment of someone else's debt
[C] something valuable that you give to someone temporarily while you do what you promised to do for them, and that they will keep if you fail to do it

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guaranteeverb [T]

uk   /ˌɡær.ənˈtiː/ us   /ˌɡer.ənˈtiː/
  • guarantee verb [T] (PROMISE)

If a product is guaranteed, the company that made it promises to repair or change it if a fault develops within a particular period of time: The fridge is guaranteed for three years.
B2 to promise that something will happen or exist: [+ two objects] European Airlines guarantees its customers top-quality service. The label on this bread says it is guaranteed free of/from preservatives (= it contains no preservatives).
If you guarantee someone's debt, you formally promise to accept the responsibility for that debt if the person fails to pay it.

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(Definition of guarantee from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"guarantee" in American English

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guaranteenoun [C/U]

us   /ˌɡær·ənˈti, ˈɡær·ənˌti/
a promise that something will be done or will happen, esp. a written promise by a company to repair or change a product that develops a fault within a particular period of time: [C] The vacuum cleaner comes with a two-year guarantee.
Guarantee is also the state of being certain of a particular result: [U] No matter how many stars you have in the show, there’s no guarantee (= it is not certain that) it will be a success.

guaranteeverb [T]

us   /ˌɡær·ənˈti, ˈɡær·ənˌti/
If you guarantee something, you promise that a particular thing will happen or exist: [+ (that) clause] I guarantee (you) that our team will play hard and have a shot at winning the championship.
If something is guaranteed to happen or have a particular result, it is certain that it will happen or have that result: [+ to infinitive] Eating all that rich food is guaranteed to give you indigestion.
(Definition of guarantee from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"guarantee" in Business English

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guaranteeverb [T]

uk   /ˌɡærənˈtiː/ us  
to promise that something will happen or is true: guarantee sb sth European Airlines guarantees its customers top-quality service.guarantee that sth is sth We guarantee that our products are 100% safe.be guaranteed (to be) sth Their bread is guaranteed free of preservatives.
to make something sure to happen or to be true: Good design does not always guarantee success.guarantee that How can we guarantee that no one can access our intranet?
COMMERCE if a company guarantees a product or service, it gives a written promise to return the customer's money or repair or exchange the product if there is a problem with it within a particular period: guarantee sth for sth We guarantee all our work for six months.
BANKING to offer something valuable to someone with the agreement that they can keep it if you fail to pay a loan or do what you promise: If you guarantee the loan, you will lose the business if you default on payments.

guaranteenoun

uk   /ˌɡærənˈtiː/ us  
[C or U] COMMERCE a written promise by a company to return a customer's money or repair or change the product if there is a problem within a particular period after buying it: The system costs £99.95 including postage, packing and a 12-month guarantee. I'm afraid we can't replace the television as it's no longer under guarantee.come with/have/carry a guarantee The laptop has a two-year guarantee.a guarantee on sth There is a six-month guarantee on all our vehicle repairs. The store offers money-back guarantees on all electronics.
[C] something that makes another thing sure to happen or to be true: no guarantee of sth/not a guarantee of sth Laboratory testing of a new drug is not a guarantee of safety.a guarantee that There is no guarantee that the discussions will lead to a deal.
[C] a promise from someone that something will be done or will happen: a guarantee that The CEO gave employees a guarantee that he would keep the factory open at all costs.
[C] BANKING something valuable that you offer to someone with the agreement that they can keep it if you fail to pay a loan or do what you promise: a guarantee against sth The mortgage borrower provides the house as a guarantee against the loan.
(Definition of guarantee from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“guarantee” in American English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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