Meaning of “guide” in the English Dictionary

"guide" in British English

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guidenoun [ C ]

uk /ɡaɪd/ us /ɡaɪd/

guide noun [ C ] (BOOK)

B1 a book that gives you the most important information about a particular subject:

a hotel/wine guide
a guide to the birds of North America

a guidebook:

a guide to Spain
travel guides

More examples

  • He has written a fully comprehensive guide to Rome.
  • He's written the definitive guide to Britain's Lake District.
  • The informative asides about rural life make this wine guide rather special.
  • The grammar guide falls between two stools - it's too difficult for a beginner but not detailed enough for an advanced student.
  • It says in the guide that this area of the countryside offers some of the best walks in England.

guide noun [ C ] (HELP)

something that helps you form an opinion or make a decision about something else:

I never follow recipes exactly when I cook - I just use them as rough guides.

More examples

  • Use the picture on the front of the box as a guide to what the finished model should look like.
  • The instructions are offered as guides and are not meant to be taken too literally.
  • The number of houses for sale gives you a guide to the state of the property market.
  • The tests are a rough guide to students' progress.
  • As a rough guide, ten paces is about equal to ten yards.

guide noun [ C ] (PERSON)

A2 a person whose job is showing a place or a particular route to visitors:

We hired a guide to take us up into the mountains.
a tour guide

More examples

  • A guide conducts tours of the cathedral every afternoon.
  • We had to ask our guide to interpret for us.
  • We needed a guide and he was only too happy to oblige.
  • You will be taken round the museum by one of the guides.
  • The guides sometimes receive gratuities from the tourists that supplement their salaries.

guideverb

uk /ɡaɪd/ us /ɡaɪd/

guide verb (HELP)

[ T ] to show someone how to do something difficult:

Our lawyer guided us through the more complicated questions on the form.

More examples

  • The government is planning to launch a benchmarking scheme to guide consumers.
  • Parents have the right to expect information to guide them through a growing, yet unregulated market.
  • The instructions will guide you through the process of assembling the equipment.
  • The glossary is useful for guiding you through some of the technical terms that are used in the book.
  • The help file will guide you through the installation process.

guide verb (SHOW WAY)

B1 [ T ] to show people around a place:

The curator guided us through the gallery, pointing out the most famous paintings in the collection.
a guided tour of the city

B1 [ T ] to take someone somewhere or to show someone how to get somewhere:

The shop assistant guided me to the shelf where the gardening books were displayed.
The runway lights guide the plane in to land.

[ T usually + adv/prep ] to take hold of part of someone's body, especially their arm, and take that person somewhere:

He took my arm and guided me to the bar.

More examples

  • Jane guided us round the colleges.
  • My colleague here will guide you around the museum.
  • He guided us through the woods.
  • It's better if you have someone to guide you round the city.
  • Shall I guide you round the house?

Guidenoun

uk /ɡaɪd/ us /ɡaɪd/

(Definition of “guide” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"guide" in American English

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guidenoun [ C ]

us /ɡɑɪd/

a person whose job it is to show a place or a route to visitors:

Our tour guide in Rome was a lovely young woman who spoke perfect English.

A guide is also a book or piece of information that gives advice or help on how to do or understand something:

a travel guide
a guide to the best restaurants
a tax guide

guideverb [ T ]

us /ɡɑɪd/

to show a place or a route to visitors:

She guided me into her living room and offered me a seat on her couch.
We took a guided tour of (= A guide showed us) the historic houses in Newport.

to give someone advice or help on how to do or understand something:

If you want to learn how to use the computer, it has a program that will guide you through it (= show you how to use it).

To guide someone or something can also mean to control or influence that person or thing:

Public policy must be guided by the best information available.

(Definition of “guide” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"guide" in Business English

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guidenoun [ C ]

uk /ɡaɪd/ us

something that helps you form an opinion or make a decision about something else:

Examine your financial goals using the checklist on page 120 as a guide.
a guide to sth GDP is not always a reliable guide to the health of an economy.
As a rough guide, expect to pay up to €500 for a basic website.

a book, website, etc. that gives you the most important information about a particular subject:

a useful guide for new investors
a guide to sth The website is an online consumer guide to the best electronic products.

also tour guide a person whose job is showing a place or a particular route to visitors:

Our guide was full of wonderful stories.

guideverb

uk /ɡaɪd/ us

[ T ] to help someone form an opinion or make a decision:

The survey is used to guide interest rate policy.
Public opinion is guided by the mass media.
A love of risk and adventure has guided his career.

[ T ] to show someone how to do something difficult:

guide sb through/to/toward sth Our lawyer guided us through the more complicated questions on the form.
The new system is designed to guide consumers to the cheapest and simplest loan offers.
A team of advisors was hired to guide the company forward.

[ T ] to take someone somewhere, or make something move in the direction in which you want it to go:

guide sb/sth around/into/toward sth A series of signs guide visitors around the factory.
Guide the motor carefully into place and secure it with the screws.

(Definition of “guide” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)