hammer Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “hammer” in the English Dictionary

"hammer" in British English

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hammernoun [C]

uk   /ˈhæm.ər/  us   //
  • hammer noun [C] (TOOL)

B2 a ​tool consisting of a ​piece of ​metal with a ​flat end that is ​fixed onto the end of a ​long, ​thin, usually ​woodenhandle, used for ​hitting things

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  • hammer noun [C] (PART OF PIANO)

one of the ​parts of a ​piano that ​hits the ​strings to make a ​sound

hammerverb

uk   /ˈhæm.ər/  us   //
  • hammer verb (USE TOOL)

[I or T, usually + adv/prep] to ​hit something with a hammer: Can you ​hold this ​nail in ​position while I hammer it into the ​door? I could ​hear you hammering ​upstairs. My car's got a ​dent, and I was ​hoping they'd be ​able to hammer it out (= ​remove it by hammering).
  • hammer verb (HIT WITH FORCE)

[I or T, usually + adv/prep] to ​hit or ​kick something with a lot of ​force: I was ​woken up ​suddenly by the ​sound of someone hammering on/at the ​frontdoor. He hammered the ​ball into the ​net, giving France a 3–2 ​win over Italy.
  • hammer verb (CRITICIZE)

[T] informal to ​criticize someone or something ​strongly: Her ​latestfilm has been hammered by the ​critics.
(Definition of hammer from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"hammer" in American English

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hammernoun [C]

 us   /ˈhæm·ər/
a ​tool with a ​heavymetaltopattached to a ​straighthandle, used for ​hitting an ​object such as a ​nail into a ​substance that ​holds it ​firmly in ​place

hammerverb [I/T]

 us   /ˈhæm·ər/
to ​hit something ​repeatedly with, or as if with, a hammer: [T] I hammered the ​nail into the ​wall. To hammer is also to ​repeat again and again esp. to ​persuade other ​people about something: [I always + adv/prep] Martin Luther King, Jr., hammered at the ​theme that the ​civilrightsmovement must ​avoidviolence. [I always + adv/prep] His ​attorneys hammered away at the ​idea that the ​policedepartment was ​incompetent.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of hammer from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"hammer" in Business English

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hammerverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈhæmər/
to ​reduce the ​value or ​amount of something: Concern over the ​economiccrisis continues to hammer the country's ​stockmarket and ​currency, with both ​falling by 6%.be/get hammered (by sth) Public ​transportusers will be hammered by a 15 ​percentreduction in ​service set to go into ​effect June 17.
hammer the market to ​sell a large ​number of ​shares in the belief that ​prices are ​higher than they should be
hammer sth home to make ​certain that something is understood by ​expressing it clearly and forcefully: The severity of the ​slump in the ​housingmarket has been hammered ​home by ​figuresreleased recently by the ​banks.hammer home a message/point It is hoped that the latest ​advertisingcampaign will hammer ​home the ​message about the dangers of alcohol.

hammernoun

uk   us   /ˈhæmər/ COMMERCE
come/go under the hammer to be ​sold at an auction to the ​person who ​offers the most ​money: Auctioneers ​estimate the ​collection could fetch up to £50,000 when it goes under the hammer next month.
(Definition of hammer from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“hammer” in American English

“hammer” in Business English

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