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Meaning of “hang up” in the English Dictionary

"hang up" in British English

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hang up

phrasal verb with hang uk   /hæŋ/  us   /hæŋ/ verb

hang-upnoun [C]

uk   /ˈhæŋ.ʌp/  us   /ˈhæŋ.ʌp/ informal
a permanent and unreasonable feeling of anxiety about a particular feature of yourself: sexual hang-ups He's one of these men who went bald very young and has a terrible hang-up about it.
(Definition of hang up from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"hang up" in American English

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hang up

phrasal verb with hang  us   /hæŋ/ verb (past tense and past participle hung  /hʌŋ/ )
  • (TELEPHONE)

to end a telephone conversation by ending the connection: Don’t hang up – there’s something else I want to say. She hung up on me (= suddenly ended the connection between us) in the middle of a sentence.

hang-upnoun [C]

 us   /ˈhæŋ·ʌp/ infml
a problem that causes a delay: The doctor never got back to me with the test results – I guess there was some hang-up over the weekend.
A hang-up is also a feeling of anxiety: Everyone has their hang-up.
(Definition of hang up from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “hang up”
in Arabic يُنْهي المُكالَمة…
in Korean 전화를 끊다…
in Portuguese desligar…
in Catalan penjar…
in Japanese 電話を切る…
in Chinese (Simplified) 挂断电话…
in Turkish konşumayı bitirmek, ahizeyi yerine koymak, telefonu kapamak…
in Russian вешать трубку…
in Chinese (Traditional) 掛斷電話…
in Italian appendere il ricevitore…
in Polish odkładać słuchawkę…
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“hang up” in British English

“hang up” in American English

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A bunch of stuff about plurals
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