happy Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “happy” in the English Dictionary

"happy" in British English

See all translations

happyadjective

uk   us   /ˈhæp.i/

happy adjective (PLEASED)

A1 feeling, ​showing, or ​causingpleasure or ​satisfaction: a happy ​marriage/​childhood She ​looks so happy. School ​days are said to be the happiest ​days of ​yourlife. Nicky ​seems a lot happier since she ​met Steve. You'll be happy toknow that Jean is coming with us. I'm ​perfectly happy to (= I will ​willingly)help out. I'm so happy (that) everything is ​working out for you. Barry ​seems happy enough ​working for himself. Are you happy about/with (= ​satisfied with)your new ​workingarrangements? Your mother's not going to be very happy when she ​sees the ​mess you've made!formal The ​manager will be happy (= is ​willing) tosee you this ​afternoon.
More examples

happy adjective (GREETING)

A1 [before noun] (used in ​greetings for ​specialoccasions) ​full of ​enjoyment and ​pleasure: Happy Birthday! Happy Anniversary! Happy New Year!
More examples

happy adjective (LUCKY)

[before noun] (of a ​condition or ​situation) ​lucky: We hadn't ​planned to be in France at the same ​time as Ann and Charles - it was just a happy coincidence.

happy adjective (SUITABLE)

literary (of words or ​behaviour) ​suitable: It wasn't a happy ​choice of phrase given the ​circumstances.
(Definition of happy from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"happy" in American English

See all translations

happyadjective

 us   /ˈhæp·i/

happy adjective (PLEASED)

feeling, ​showing, or causing ​pleasure or ​satisfaction: To ​tell the ​truth, I’ve never been happier in my ​wholelife. People ​wantmovies to have happy endings. [+ (that) clause] I’m happy (that) everything is ​working out for you. I’ve been very happy with (= ​satisfied with) the ​education that my ​boys have ​gotten through ​scouting. Happy is used as a ​polite way to ​expressyourwillingness to do something: [+ to infinitive] I’m ​driving that way and I’d be happy to ​drop you off at ​yourhome. [+ to infinitive] It was no ​trouble at all – I was happy to be of ​help. Happy is also used in ​greetings for ​specialoccasions, ​expressing good ​wishes: Happy ​birthday! Happy New ​Year

happy adjective (LUCKY)

lucky: By a happy ​coincidence, we ​found ourselves on the same ​flight. Note: said about a condition or situation
(Definition of happy from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of happy?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

golden

made of gold

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by Cambridge Dictionaries Online,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More