heavy Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “heavy” in the English Dictionary

"heavy" in British English

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heavyadjective

uk   /ˈhev.i/  us   /ˈhev.i/
  • heavy adjective (WEIGHING A LOT)

A2 weighing a lot, and needing effort to move or lift: heavy equipment heavy work/lifting How heavy is that box? (= How much does it weigh?)

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  • heavy adjective (TO A GREAT DEGREE)

B1 (especially of something unpleasant) of very or especially great force, amount, or degree: a heavy blow to the head heavy fighting heavy traffic heavy rain/snow a heavy smoker/drinker a heavy sleeper
heavy seas
sea that is rough with large waves

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  • heavy adjective (UNPLEASANT)

old-fashioned slang used to describe something such as a situation that is dangerous or unpleasant: Then the police arrived and things got really heavy.

heavynoun [C]

uk   /ˈhev.i/  us   /ˈhev.i/ slang
(Definition of heavy from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"heavy" in American English

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heavyadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /ˈhev·i/
weighing a lot: The piano’s much too heavy for one person to lift. Bob’s much heavier than the last time I saw him.
thick, strong, solid, or looking that way: heavy clouds heavy cream It’s too hot today for a heavy meal (= a large, cooked meal that is hard to digest).
of great amount, or degree, or force: heavy snow/rain/fog heavy traffic a heavy workload a heavy sleeper heavy fighting
(Definition of heavy from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"heavy" in Business English

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heavyadjective

uk   us   /ˈhevi/
larger in number or amount than usual: heavy taxes/fines/subsidies Those found to be violating the law could face heavy fines. Salaries and bonuses of directors have been cut by a third after heavy criticism of 'fat-cat' payments. There are worries that the dollar will come under heavy pressure later in the year. a heavy burden/debt/loss heavy demand/selling/investment
involving a lot of work and effort: a heavy workload/schedule
heavy on sth
having a lot of something: Some faculty members have criticized the board as too heavy on business people and too light on educational experience.
pay a heavy price (for sth)
to be in a very difficult situation because of a mistake or bad decision that has been made: If we reject the deal, we will pay a heavy price in terms of trade, jobs, and investment.
(Definition of heavy from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“heavy” in Business English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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