hijack Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “hijack” in the English Dictionary

"hijack" in British English

See all translations

hijackverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk/
to take ​control of an ​aircraft or other ​vehicle during a ​journey, ​especially using ​violence: Two men hijacked a ​jettravelling to Paris and ​demanded $125,000. disapproving to take ​control of or use something that does not ​belong to you for ​your own ​advantage: He ​resents the way his ​ideas have been hijacked by ​others in the ​department.
hijacker
noun [C] uk   /r/  us   //

hijacknoun [C or U]

uk   us   /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk/ (also hijacking)
an ​occasion when someone uses ​force to take ​control of an ​aircraft or other ​vehicle: The hijack ​ended with the ​release of all the plane's ​passengersunharmed. He’s a ​leadingsuspect in the hijacking of the ​jetliner.
(Definition of hijack from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"hijack" in American English

See all translations

hijackverb [T]

 us   /ˈhɑɪˌdʒæk/
to ​force someone to give you ​control of a ​vehicle, ​aircraft, or ​ship that is in the ​middle of a ​trip: Gunmen ​tried to hijack ​theirtruck. Someone who hijacks someone else’s ​ideas or ​plans uses those ​ideas and ​claims to have ​created them: The ​movie hijacks some of ​itsstyle from "Blade Runner."
hijacking
noun [C/U]  us   /ˈhɑɪˌdʒæk·ɪŋ/
[U] He’s a ​leadingsuspect in the hijacking of the jetliner.
(Definition of hijack from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"hijack" in Business English

See all translations

hijackverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈhaɪdʒæk/
to take ​control of something, such as another person's ​plan, a ​system, or a ​meeting for your own ​advantage: The ​association is annoyed that its ​campaign has been hijacked by pin-striped PR men.
IT to take ​control of a ​computer belonging to someone else without their ​permission, especially for ​illegalpurposes: Hundreds of the department's powerful ​computers were hijacked by ​hackers, who used them to ​sendspamemail.
(Definition of hijack from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of hijack?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day
boarding school

a school where students live and study

Word of the Day

Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
Introducing a new author and a new weekly blog post!
by ,
August 27, 2015
The English language is constantly changing. You know that. But did you know that at Cambridge Dictionaries Online we keep track of the changes? We continually add new words and new meanings to our online dictionary for learners of English. Some of them are new to English entirely (neologisms), and some are new to our

Read More 

hyperpalatable adjective
hyperpalatable adjective
August 24, 2015
describes food with heightened levels of sugar and salt, intended to be extremely appealing In Brazil, where the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has doubled since 1980, crisps, biscuits, energy bars and sugary drinks formulated to be ‘hyper-palatable’ are much more widely eaten than previously.

Read More