Meaning of “hijack” in the English Dictionary

"hijack" in British English

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hijackverb [ T ]

uk /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk/ us /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk/

to take control of an aircraft or other vehicle during a journey, especially using violence:

Two men hijacked a jet travelling to Paris and demanded $125,000.

disapproving to take control of or use something that does not belong to you for your own advantage:

He resents the way his ideas have been hijacked by others in the department.
hijacker
noun [ C ] uk /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk.ər/ us /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk.ɚ/

hijacknoun [ C or U ]

uk /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk/ us /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk/ also hijacking

an occasion when someone uses force to take control of an aircraft or other vehicle:

The hijack ended with the release of all the plane's passengers unharmed.
He’s a leading suspect in the hijacking of the jetliner.

(Definition of “hijack” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"hijack" in American English

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hijackverb [ T ]

us /ˈhɑɪˌdʒæk/

to force someone to give you control of a vehicle, aircraft, or ship that is in the middle of a trip:

Gunmen tried to hijack their truck.

Someone who hijacks someone else’s ideas or plans uses those ideas and claims to have created them:

The movie hijacks some of its style from "Blade Runner."
hijacking
noun [ C/U ] us /ˈhɑɪˌdʒæk·ɪŋ/

[ U ] He’s a leading suspect in the hijacking of the jetliner.

(Definition of “hijack” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"hijack" in Business English

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hijackverb [ T ]

uk /ˈhaɪdʒæk/ us

to take control of something, such as another person's plan, a system, or a meeting for your own advantage:

The association is annoyed that its campaign has been hijacked by pin-striped PR men.

IT to take control of a computer belonging to someone else without their permission, especially for illegal purposes:

Hundreds of the department's powerful computers were hijacked by hackers, who used them to send spam email.

(Definition of “hijack” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)