hijack Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “hijack” in the English Dictionary

"hijack" in British English

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hijackverb [T]

uk   /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk/ us   /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk/
to take control of an aircraft or other vehicle during a journey, especially using violence: Two men hijacked a jet travelling to Paris and demanded $125,000.
disapproving to take control of or use something that does not belong to you for your own advantage: He resents the way his ideas have been hijacked by others in the department.

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hijacker
noun [C] uk   /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk.ər/ us   /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk.ɚ/

hijacknoun [C or U]

uk   /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk/ us   /ˈhaɪ.dʒæk/ also hijacking
an occasion when someone uses force to take control of an aircraft or other vehicle: The hijack ended with the release of all the plane's passengers unharmed. He’s a leading suspect in the hijacking of the jetliner.
(Definition of hijack from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"hijack" in American English

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hijackverb [T]

us   /ˈhɑɪˌdʒæk/
to force someone to give you control of a vehicle, aircraft, or ship that is in the middle of a trip: Gunmen tried to hijack their truck.
Someone who hijacks someone else’s ideas or plans uses those ideas and claims to have created them: The movie hijacks some of its style from "Blade Runner."
hijacking
noun [C/U] us   /ˈhɑɪˌdʒæk·ɪŋ/
[U] He’s a leading suspect in the hijacking of the jetliner.
(Definition of hijack from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"hijack" in Business English

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hijackverb [T]

uk   /ˈhaɪdʒæk/ us  
to take control of something, such as another person's plan, a system, or a meeting for your own advantage: The association is annoyed that its campaign has been hijacked by pin-striped PR men.
IT to take control of a computer belonging to someone else without their permission, especially for illegal purposes: Hundreds of the department's powerful computers were hijacked by hackers, who used them to send spam email.
(Definition of hijack from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“hijack” in British English

“hijack” in American English

“hijack” in Business English

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