holding Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “holding” in the English Dictionary

"holding" in British English

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holdingnoun [C usually plural]

uk   /ˈhəʊl.dɪŋ/  us   /ˈhoʊl-/
something that you own such as shares in a ​company or ​buildings, or ​land that you ​rent and ​farm: To ​ensuresecurity the ​investmentfund has holdings in many ​companies.

holdingadjective [before noun]

uk   /ˈhəʊl.dɪŋ/  us   /ˈhoʊl-/ specialized
(Definition of holding from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"holding" in Business English

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holdingnoun [C]

uk   us   /ˈhəʊldɪŋ/ FINANCE
assets such as ​property, ​shares, or ​cash that a ​government, ​company, or ​personowns: holding in sth The ​government announced that it would ​replace its ​goldreserves with holdings in ​dollars, ​euros and ​yen. Foreign ​centralbanks might ​reduce their holdings of American Treasury ​bonds. cash/​stock/​property, etc. holdings
the ​amount of a company's ​shares that a ​person or ​organizationowns: holding in sth He is considering ​selling his 28% holding in the ​company.increase/raise/build up a holding The Chairman ​bought a further 80,000 ​shares, ​increasing his holding to 20.3%.reduce/cut a holding The ​sale is ​part of a ​plan by the Dutch ​state to ​reduce its holding in the ​former government-controlled ​group.
Holdings [plural] used in the ​names of some holding ​companies: TEC Holdings has been in existence since 2007.
(Definition of holding from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “holding”
in Chinese (Simplified) 私人股份, 私人建筑, 租用的农田…
in Turkish hisse, pay…
in Russian акции…
in Chinese (Traditional) 私人股份, 私人建築, 租用的農田…
in Polish udział…
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“holding” in British English

“holding” in Business English

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