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Meaning of “homework” in the English Dictionary

"homework" in British English

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homeworknoun [U]

uk   /ˈhəʊm.wɜːk/  us   /ˈhoʊm.wɝːk/
A1 work that ​teachers give ​theirstudents to do at ​home: You can't ​watch TV until you've doneyour homework. history/​geography homework

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(Definition of homework from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"homework" in American English

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homeworknoun [U]

 us   /ˈhoʊmˌwɜrk/
studying that ​students do at ​home to ​prepare for ​school: The ​teacher told us to ​readchapter five for homework. fig.The ​travel agent's ​associationsuggests that travelers do ​their homework (= ​study the ​availableinformationclosely)to ​find the ​deal that is ​best for them.
(Definition of homework from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"homework" in Business English

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homeworknoun

uk   us   /ˈhəʊmwɜːk/
do your homework
to ​study a ​subject or ​situation carefully so that you know a lot about it and can ​deal with it successfully: The ​companyworking on the ​project had clearly done their homework on ​universaldesignissues.
(Definition of homework from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “homework”
in Arabic واجِب…
in Korean 숙제…
in Portuguese lição de casa, dever de casa…
in Catalan deures…
in Japanese 宿題…
in Chinese (Simplified) 家庭作业…
in Turkish ev ödevi…
in Russian домашнее задание, уроки…
in Chinese (Traditional) 功課…
in Italian compito di casa…
in Polish zadanie lub zadania domowe…
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