hook Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “hook” in the English Dictionary

"hook" in British English

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hooknoun [C]

uk   us   /hʊk/
  • hook noun [C] (DEVICE)

B2 a ​curveddevice used for ​catching or ​holding things, ​especially one ​attached to a ​surface for ​hanging things on: a ​coat/​picture hook a ​boat hook a ​fish hook

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hookverb

uk   us   /hʊk/
  • hook verb (FASTEN)

[T] to ​fasten something with a hook, ​hang something on a hook, or ​catch something with a hook: He hooked the ​trailer (= ​joined it with a hook) to his ​car. How many ​salmon did you hook (= ​catch) this ​afternoon? She hooked the ​shoe (= ​lifted it with a hook) out of the ​water.
  • hook verb (HAVE SEX)

[I] US informal to have ​sex for ​money
(Definition of hook from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"hook" in American English

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hooknoun [C]

 us   /hʊk/
a ​curveddevice used for ​catchinghold of something or for ​hanging something on: Hang ​yourcoat on one of the hooks in the ​hall. I need to ​change the hook on my ​fishingline.

hookverb [T]

 us   /hʊk/
to use something like a hook, or to put something so that it is ​supported at one end and ​hangs: She hooked her ​arm through his. He hooked his ​cane over the back of the ​chair. To hook ​fishmeans to ​catch them on hooks: We hooked some ​bass.
(Definition of hook from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"hook" in Business English

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hooknoun [C]

uk   us   /hʊk/ informal
MARKETING something that is used to ​attractcustomers' ​attention, and encourage them to ​buy a ​product or ​service: Special ​deals on ​bestsellers are used as hooks to ​sellvolumes from ​publishers' back ​catalogues.
be on the hook (for sth/to do sth) US informal to ​owemoney or be ​legallyresponsible for something: The cleanup ​plan called for the ​companies, which are on the hook for cleanup ​costs, to dredge ​contaminated sediments from the river. If the ​investmentcompanyfails, they are on the hook to ​pay the ​loan.
off the hook having escaped from a difficult ​situation or punishment: be/get off the hook Don't ​think you're off the hook on ​taxes just because you were ​paid in ​cash.get/let sb off the hook The ​minister was last night under ​fire for ​letting the ​bigbanks off the hook.

hookverb [T]

uk   us   /hʊk/
MARKETING to ​attract someone's ​attention or encourage them to ​buy a ​product or ​service: Financial marketers know that money-off ​deals hook ​customers and ​keep them ​loyal. Once ​people have ​tried this ​product, they will be hooked for ​life.
IT to ​connect a ​machine to a ​powersupply, or to another ​machine: hook sth to sth The ​high-speeddigital connector is used to hook all kinds of ​devices to your ​computer.
(Definition of hook from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“hook” in American English

“hook” in Business English

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