Meaning of “hunt” in the English Dictionary

"hunt" in British English

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huntverb [ I or T ]

uk /hʌnt/ us /hʌnt/

hunt verb [ I or T ] (CHASE)

B1 to chase and try to catch and kill an animal or bird for food, sport, or profit:

Some animals hunt at night.
When lion cubs are young, the mother stays with them while the father hunts for food.
Jack and Charlie like to hunt/go hunting (= chase and kill animals for sport) at weekends.
Cats like to hunt mice and birds.
Elephants used to be hunted for the ivory from their tusks.

in Britain, to chase and kill animals, especially foxes, using dogs and riding on horses

More examples

  • Wolves hunt in groups known as packs.
  • These animals sleep in the day and hunt at night.
  • So why do people still go hunting - is it the thrill of the chase?
  • The owl hunts mice and other small mammals, and sometimes other birds.
  • He's a great fan of blood sports - he hunts and shoots and so on.

hunt verb [ I or T ] (SEARCH)

B2 to try to find something or someone:

I've hunted all over the place, but I can't find that book.
They are still hunting for the missing child.
I've hunted high and low (= looked everywhere) for my gloves.
Police are hunting the terrorists who planted the bomb.
I'll try and hunt out (= find) those old photographs for you.
They have spent months house-/job-hunting (= looking for a house/a job).

More examples

  • Soldiers were dispatched to hunt for the leaders of the uprising.
  • Police are hunting for a man who was seen running away from the murder scene.
  • The children got up early to hunt for Easter eggs in the garden.
  • I hunted everywhere for my keys, and then I found them still in the door!
  • Could you all hunt through your desk drawers, in case the envelope was accidentally put away there.

Phrasal verb(s)

huntnoun

uk /hʌnt/ us /hʌnt/

hunt noun (SEARCH)

C1 [ C usually singular ] a search for something or someone:

After a long hunt we finally found a house we liked.
The hunt for the injured climber continued throughout the night.
Police are on the hunt (= searching) for the kidnappers.
The hunt is on (= the search has started) for the Mayor's successor.

More examples

  • Our hunt for a new tenant ended when she replied to the advert.
  • The hunt for a successor will begin immediately.
  • The hunt for the stolen painting is focusing on known criminals.
  • How's the house hunt going?
  • She embarked on a hunt for a suitable replacement.

hunt noun (CHASE)

[ C ] the activity of people chasing wild animals in order to kill them:

to go on a fox/deer hunt

[ C ] in the UK, a group of people who meet regularly in order to chase and kill animals, especially foxes:

They are members of the local hunt.

More examples

  • He spent a day accompanying a local fox hunt as an observer.
  • The hounds waited for a signal from the master of the hunt.
  • He is a regular member of the local hunt.
  • A landowner has the right to ask the hunt to keep off his or her land.
  • On Boxing Day, many hunts traditionally take place around the country.

(Definition of “hunt” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"hunt" in American English

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huntverb [ I/T ]

us /hʌnt/

hunt verb [ I/T ] (CHASE)

to chase or search for a wild animal or bird with the intention of killing or catching it for food, sport, or profit:

[ I ] He hunts every weekend.
[ T ] Cats like to hunt mice and birds.

hunt verb [ I/T ] (SEARCH)

to search for something or someone:

[ I ] I’ve hunted everywhere for the missing keys.

Phrasal verb(s)

huntnoun [ C ]

/hʌnt/

hunt noun [ C ] (CHASE)

a chase or search for a wild animal or bird with the intention of killing or catching it:

a deer hunt

hunt noun [ C ] (SEARCH)

a search for something or someone:

The hunt for the injured climber continued through the night.

(Definition of “hunt” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)