Meaning of “hurry” in the English Dictionary

"hurry" in British English

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hurryverb [ I or T ]

uk /ˈhʌr.i/ us /ˈhɝː.i/

A2 to move or do things more quickly than normal or to make someone do this:

Hurry or you'll be late.
[ + to infinitive ] She hurried to answer the phone.
I refuse to be hurried into a decision (= to be forced to make a decision too quickly).
After spending her lunch hour shopping, she hurried back (= returned quickly) to work.
I hate to hurry you, but I have to leave in a few minutes.
UK Don't hurry your food (= don't eat it too quickly).

More examples

  • Come on - we're going to be late if you don't hurry!
  • If we hurry, there's still a chance we could catch the plane.
  • Clutching the money to his chest, he hurried to the bank.
  • She gathered the children up and hurried into the house.
  • The owner of the vehicle came hurrying along and turned off the car alarm.

Phrasal verb(s)

hurrynoun [ S ]

uk /ˈhʌr.i/ us /ˈhɝː.i/

B1 the need to move or do things more quickly than normal:

We left in such a hurry that we forgot our tickets.
"Can you wait a few minutes?" "Yes, I'm not in any hurry/I'm in no hurry (= I can wait)."
Are you in a hurry (= wanting) to leave?
What's (all) the hurry (for)/Why (all) the hurry? (= Why are you acting or moving so quickly?)
"I'll let you have this back next week." "That's all right, there's no (great) hurry/there isn't any (great) hurry (= no need to do it quickly)."

More examples

  • Sorry, I can't talk to you now - I'm in a desperate hurry.
  • We left in a hurry and I must have left my keys behind.
  • Hey, there's no need to push! What's your hurry?
  • In our hurry to get to school on time, Dan left his packed lunch behind.
  • Tom was clearly in a hurry to finish the meeting and get to the canteen.

(Definition of “hurry” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"hurry" in American English

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hurryverb [ I/T ]

us /ˈhɜr·i, ˈhʌ·ri/

to move or act quickly, or to cause someone to move or act quickly:

[ I ] We have to hurry if we’re going to make it there in time.
[ T ] I hurried the kids through their breakfasts.

Phrasal verb(s)

hurrynoun [ U ]

us /ˈhɜr·i, ˈhʌ·ri/

the need to move or act more quickly than normal:

We’ve got plenty of time – what’s the hurry (= Why hurry)?
He’s in a hurry to get to a meeting (= wants to get there quickly).
I’m in no hurry for the book (= I do not need it back quickly)keep it as long as you want.

(Definition of “hurry” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)