impatient Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “impatient” in the English Dictionary

"impatient" in British English

See all translations

impatientadjective

uk   /ɪmˈpeɪ.ʃənt/  us   /ɪmˈpeɪ.ʃənt/
B2 easily annoyed by someone's mistakes or because you have to wait: He's a good teacher, but inclined to be a bit impatient with slow learners. You'd be hopeless taking care of children - you're far too impatient!
B2 wanting something to happen as soon as possible: He's got a lot of exciting ideas and he's impatient to get started. People are increasingly impatient for change in this country.

expend iconexpend iconMore examples

impatiently
adverb uk   /ɪmˈpeɪ.ʃənt.li/  us   /ɪmˈpeɪ.ʃənt.li/
B2 "Yes, you said that before," she said impatiently. We were waiting impatiently for the show to begin (= wanting it to start).
(Definition of impatient from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"impatient" in American English

See all translations

impatientadjective

 us   /ɪmˈpeɪ·ʃənt/
not willing to wait for something to happen and becoming annoyed at delays: Don’t be impatient, you’ll get your turn. She grew impatient with the others.
Impatient can also mean eager for something to happen: [+ to infinitive] He was impatient to become the new boss.
impatience
noun [U]  us   /ɪmˈpeɪ·ʃəns/
The horse snorted with impatience.
impatiently
adverb  us   /ɪmˈpeɪ·ʃənt·li/
Unable to sleep, he waited impatiently for the dawn to arrive.
(Definition of impatient from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of impatient?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

“impatient” in British English

“impatient” in American English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

Read More 

Word of the Day

parasol

a type of sunshade (= round frame covered in cloth on a stick) carried especially by women in the past, to give protection from the sun

Word of the Day

convo noun
convo noun
May 23, 2016
informal a conversation The convo around concussions mostly focuses on guys who play football, but Chastain thinks that this whole thing could be a headache for women too.

Read More