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Meaning of “index” in the English Dictionary

"index" in British English

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indexnoun

uk   /ˈɪn.deks/ us   /ˈɪn.deks/ plural indices indexes
  • index noun (LIST)

C1 [C] an alphabetical list, such as one printed at the back of a book showing which page a subject, name, etc. is on: Try looking up "heart disease" in the index.
[C] a collection of information stored on a computer or on a set of cards, in alphabetical order: He still has all his friends' names and addresses on a card index.

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  • index noun (COMPARISON)

[C] a system of numbers used for comparing values of things that change according to each other or a fixed standard: the FTSE 100 Index the Dow Jones Index a wage/price index
[C usually singular] something that shows how strong or common a condition or feeling is: Consumer spending is often a good index of public confidence in the economy.

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indexverb [T]

uk   /ˈɪn.deks/ us   /ˈɪn.deks/
  • index verb [T] (MAKE LIST)

to prepare an index for a book or collection, or arrange it in an index: Our computer indexes several thousand new records every second. The book contains a lot of information, but it's not very well indexed.
(Definition of index from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"index" in American English

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indexnoun [C]

us   /ˈɪn·deks/ plural indexes /ˈɪnˌdek·səz/ indices /ˈɪn·dəˌsiz/
  • index noun [C] (LIST)

writing an alphabetical list, such as one printed at the back of a book showing on which page a name or subject appears, or computer information ordered in a particular way: If you want to find the place in the text that Henry James is mentioned, look it up in the index.
  • index noun [C] (COMPARISON)

a number used to show the value of something by comparing it to something else whose value is known: a wage/price index fig. The rate of consumer spending is often thought to be an index of public confidence (= show the state of the public’s confidence) in the health of the economy.

indexverb [T]

us   /ˈɪn·deks/
  • index verb [T] (MAKE LIST)

to prepare an index for a book, or to arrange information in an index: He organized and indexed the material by computer.
  • index verb [T] (MAKE COMPARISON)

to vary a system of numbers against another or against a fixed standard: Social Security payments are indexed to (= adjusted to allow for) inflation every year.
(Definition of index from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"index" in Business English

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indexnoun [C]

uk   /ˈɪndeks/ us  
plural indices, indexes FINANCE, ECONOMICS a system that measures the present value of something when compared to its previous value or a fixed standard: The house price index estimates the change in the value of the nation's housing stock. a bond/share/stock indexan index of sth The fund tracks an index of the UK's top 350 UK shares.
plural indices a sign or measure of something: an index of sth Unemployment levels provide a useful index of the state of the economy.
plural indexes an alphabetical list that shows you where information is found in a book, on a website, etc.: a searcheable index online indexes to articles and reports
plural indexes a collection of information that is stored in alphabetical order: I keep an index of all my clients' contact details.

indexverb [T, usually passive]

uk   /ˈɪndeks/ us  
FINANCE to connect the value of a price or payment to the value of something else such as the rate of inflation: be indexed to sth The pension is indexed to earnings. The unions are demanding wage rises indexed to prices.
to provide a book or website with an index: All content held in the site is fully indexed.
(Definition of index from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“index” in Business English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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